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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:白慧芳 大小:BEMCzXqZ22193KB 下载:SZEHp4CW15158次
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日期:2020-08-04 16:25:04
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毕姥爷

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  All the neighboring people dwelling thereabout, who knew Massetto tobe dumbe, by fetching home wood daily from the Forest, and diversemployments in other places, were made to beleeve, that by theNunnes devout prayers and discipline, as also the merite of the Saint,in whose honour the Monastery was built and erected, Massetto hadhis long restrained speech restored, and was now become their soleFactotum, having power now to employ others in drudgeries, and easehimselfe of all such labours. And albeit he made the Nunnes to befruitfull, by encreasing some store of yonger sisters, yet all matterswere so close and cleanly catried, as it was never talkt of, tillafter the death of the Ladie Abbesse, when Massetto beganne to grow ingood yeeres, and desired to returne home to his native abiding,which (within a while after) was granted him.
2.  Beleeve me Master Doctor, I would not impart to many people, whatprivate helpes we have for our maintenance: but yet I dare boldlyacquaint you therewith, in regard you are one of our most intimatefriends, and of such secrecie, as (I know) you will not reveale itto any. True it is, that mine honest neighbor and my selfe, do leadeour lives in such merry manner as you see, and better then all theworld is aware of, for I cannot imagine you to bee so ignorant, butare certainly perswaded: that if we had no better means, then ourpoore manuall trade and profession; we might sit at home with breadand water, and be nothing so lively spirited as wee are. Yet Sir, Iwould not have you to conceive, that wee do eyther rob or steale, oruse any other unlawfull courses: onely we travayle to Corsica, fromwhence we bring (without the least prejudice to anie other) all thingswe stand in need of, or whatsoever wee can desire. Thus do wemaintaine our selves well and honestly, and live in this mirthfulldisposition.
3.  ACCOMPLISH HIS PURPOSE BY SOME OTHER SUPPLY
4.  Zeppa seeing all this, spake not one word, neither made any noise atall; but kept himselfe closely hidden, to observe the yssue of thisamorous conflict. To be briefe, he saw Spinelloccio goe with hiswife into the Chamber, and make the doore fast after them, whereathe could have beene angry, which he held to be no part of truewisedome. For he knew well enough, that to make an out crie in thiscase, or otherwise to reveale this kinde of injury, it could no waymake it lesse, but rather give a greater addition of shame andscandall: he thought this no course for him to take; wiserconsiderations entred his braine, to have this wrong fully revenged,yet with such a discreete and orderly carriage, as no neighboursknowledge should by any meanes apprehend it, or the least sig ofdiscontent in himselfe blabbe it, because they were two dangerousevils.
5.  WHEREBY IS DECLARED, THAT SUCH AS KEEPE MANY HONEST SEEMING
6.  Ave Maria Sister (saide the other Nun) what kinde of words are theseyou utter? Doe not you know, that we have promised our virginity toGod? Oh Sister (answered the other) how many things are promised tohim every day, and not one of a thousand kept or performed? If weehave made him such a promise, and some of our weakerwitted sistersdo performe it for us, no doubt but he will accept it in part ofpayment. Yea but Sister, replied the second Nun againe, there isanother danger lying in the way: If we prove to be with childe, howshall we doe then? Sister (quoth our couragious wench) thou artaffraide of harme before it happen: if it come so to passe, let usconsider on it then: thou art but a Novice in matters of suchmoment, we are provided of a thousand meanes, whereby to preventconception. Or, if they should faile, we are so surely fitted, thatthe world shall never know it. Let it suffice, our lives must not beby any so much as suspected, our Monastery questioned, or our Religionrashly scandalized. Thus shee schooled her younger Sister in wit,albeit as forward as shee in will, and longed as desirouslie, toknow what kinde of creature man was.

计划指导

1.  Gracious Ladies, wee behold it daily, that those Oxen which havelaboured in the yoake most part of the day, for their moreconvenient feeding, are let forth at liberty, and permitted towander abroad in the Woods. We see moreover, that Gardens andOrchards, being planted with variety of the fairest fruit Trees, areequalled in beauty by Woods and Forrests, in the plentifull enjoyingof as goodly spreading branches. In consideration whereof,remembring how many dayes wee have already spent (under theseveritie of Lawes imposed) shaping all our discourses to a forme ofobservation: I am of opinion, that it will not onely well become us,but also prove beneficiall for us, to live no longer under suchrestraint, and like enthralled people, desirous of liberty, wee shouldno more be subjected to the yoke, but recover our former strength inwalking freely.
2.  Worthy Ladies, it exceedeth the power of my capacitie, to censure inthe case whereof I am to speake, by saying, who sinned most, eitherNature, in seating a Noble soule in a vile body, or Fortune, inbestowing on a body (beautified with a noble soule) a base or wretchedcondition of life. As we may observe by Cistio, a Citizen of our owne,and many more beside; for, this Cistio beeing endued with a singulargood spirit, Fortune hath made him no better then a Baker. And beleeveme Ladies, I could (in this case) lay as much blame on Nature, as onFortune; if I did not know Nature to be most absolutely wise, and thatFortune hath a thousand eyes, albeit fooles have figured her to beeblinde. But, upon more mature and deliberate consideration, I finde,that they both (being truly wise and judicious) have dealt justly,in imitation of our best advised mortals, who being uncertaine of suchinconveniences, as may happen unto them, do bury (for their ownbenefit) the very best and choicest things of esteeme, in the mostvile and abject places of their houses, as being subject to leastsuspition, and where they may be sure to have them at all times, forsupply of any necessitie whatsoever, because so base a conveyance hathbetter kept them, then the very best chamber in the house could havedone. Even so these two great commanders of the world, do many timeshide their most precious Jewels of worth, under the clouds of Artsor professions of worst estimation, to the end, that fetching themthence when neede requires, their splendor may appeare to be themore glorious. Nor was any such matter noted in our homely BakerCistio, by the best observation of Messer Geri Spina, who was spokenof in the late repeated Novell, as being the husband to Madame Oretta;whereby this accident came to my remembrance, and which (in a shortTale) I will relate unto you.
3.  TRULY NOBLE SOULE, CANNOT BE VIOLENCED OR CONFOUNDED, BY THE
4.  Aniolliero avouched the truth of his wrong received, but the basepeazants, giving credite onely to Fortarigoes lying exclamations:tooke him from his horse, despoyled him of all his wearingapparrell, even to the very Bootes from off his Legges: suffered himto ride away from him in that manner, and Aniolliero left so in hisshirt, to dance a bare foote Galliard after him either towards Sienna,or any place else.
5.  Already began certaine small Clouds in the West, to blush with aVermillion tincture, when those in the East (having reached to theirfull heighth) looked like bright burnished Gold, by splendour of theSun beames drawing neere unto them: when Pamphilus being risen, causedthe Ladies, and the rest of his honourable companions to be called.When they were all assembled, and had concluded together on the place,whither they should walke for their mornings recreation: the Kingledde on the way before accompanied with the two Noble LadiesPhilomena and Fiammetta, all the rest following after them,devising, talking, and answering to divers demands both what thatday was to be don, as also concerning the proposed imposition forthe forthcoming day.
6.  Arriguccio Berlinghieri, became immeasurably jelous of his WifeSimonida, who fastened a thred about her great toe, for to serve asa small, when her amorous friend should come to visite her. Arrigucciofindeth the fallacie, and while he pursueth the amorous friend, sheecauseth her Maide to lye in her bed against his returne: whom hebeateth extreamly, cutting away the lockes of her haire (thinking hehad doone all this violence to his wife Simonida:) and afterwardfetcheth her Mother and Brethren, to shame her before them, and sobe rid of her. But they finding all his speeches to be utterlyfalse; and reputing him to bee a drunken jealous foole; all theblame and disgrace falleth on himselfe.

推荐功能

1.  In good sadnesse Ancilla, I have endured the most miserablestnight of cold, frost and snow, that ever any poore Gentleman suffered;but I know well enough, your Lady was not in any fault thereof,neither meriteth to be blamed, for in her owne person (as being truelycompassionate of my distresse) she came so farre as the doore ofthis Court, to excuse her selfe, and comfort mee. But as you saide,and very well too, what hath failed this night, another hereaftermay more fortunately performe: in hope whereof, commend my love andduteous service to her, and (what else remaineth mine) to yourgentle selfe.
2.  These words pierced the heart of the King deepely, and so much themore afflicted him, because he knew them to be most true: wherefore,after he had ventred a very vehement sigh, thus he replyed. Beleeve menoble Count, there is not any enemy, how strong soever he be, but Ihold him weake and easie to be vanquished, by him who is skilfull inthe warre, where a man may learne to conquere his owne appetite. Butbecause he shall find it a laborious taske, requiring inestimablestrength and courage; your words have so toucht me to the quicke, thatit becommeth me to let you effectually perceive (and within thecompasse of few dayes) that as I have learned to conquer others, soI am not ignorant, in expressing the like power upon my selfe.Having thus spoken, within some few dayes after, the King beingreturned to Naples, he determined, as we to free himself from anythe like ensuing follie, as also to recompence Signior Neri, for thegreat kindnesse he had shewne to him (although it was a difficultthing, to let another enjoy, what he rather desired for himselfe) tohave the two Damosels married, not as the Daughters of Signior Neri,but even as if they were his owne. And by consent of the Father, hegave Genevera the faire, to Signior Maffeo da Palizzi, and Isottathe amiable, to Signior Gulielmo della Magna, two Noble Knights andhonourable Barons. After he had thus given them in marriage, in sadmourning he departed thence into Apuglia, where by following worthyand honourable actions, he so well overcame all inordinateappetites: that shaking off the enthraling fetters of love, he livedfree from all passions, the rest of his life time, and dyed as anhonourable King.
3.  How now Buffalmaco (quoth Bruno) what is thine opinion now? Thouwouldst not beleeve me when I told thee, that there is not a Doctor inall these parts, more skilfull in distinguishing the Urine of an Asse,from any other, then this most expert and singular man: and I dareboldly maintaine it, that his fellow is not to bee found, from henceto the very gates of Paris. Go then, and doe the uttermost endeavourthat thou canst, to grant the request which he hath made.
4.  Two Citizens of Siena, the one named Tingoccio Mini, and the otherMeucio di Tura, affected both one woman, called Monna Mita, to whomthe one of them was a Gossip. The Gossip dyed, and appearedafterward to his companion, according as he had formerly promisedhim to doe, and tolde him what strange wonders he had seene in theother world.
5.   No sooner did Constance behold him, but she was ready to dye withconceite of joy, and being unable to containe her passion: sodainelyshe threw her armes about his necke, and in meere compassion of hermany misfortunes, as also the instant solace of her soule (not beingable to utter one word) the teares trickled abundantly downe hercheekes. Martuccio also seeing his faire friend, was overcome withexceeding admiration, and stood awhile, as not knowing what to say;till venting forth a vehement sighe, thus he spake. My deerest loveConstance! Art thou yet living? It is a tedious long while since Iheard thou wast lost, and never any tydings knowne of thee in thineowne Fathers house. With which words, the teares standing in his eyes,most lovingly he embraced her, Constance recounted to him all herfortunes, and what kindnesse she had receyved from the SarazineLady, since her first houre of comming to her. And after much otherdiscourse passing betweene them, Martuccio departed from her, andreturning to the King his master, tolde him all the history of hisfortunes, and those beside of his Love Constance, being purposelyminded (with his gracious liking) to marry her according to theChristian Law.
6.  THE TENTH DAY, THE FOURTH NOVELL

应用

1.  If Love were free from jealousie,
2.  PERSON, TO BEE COVETOUS; BUT RATHER TO BE LIBERALL TO
3.  After they were gone a good distance off, the good old man beganthus to question his Wife. What is become of (quoth hee) our youngGentlewoman, which came so late to us yesternight? I have not seen herto day since our arising. The old woman made answer, that she knew notwhere she was, and sought all about to finde her. Angelinaes fearesbeing well over-blowne, and hearing none of the former noise, whichmade her the better hope of their departure, came forth of theHay-stack; wherof the good old man was not a little joyfull, andbecause she had so well escaped from them: so seeing it was nowbroad day-light, he said unto her. Now that the morning is sofairely begun, if you can be so well contented, we will bring you to aCastle, which stands about two miles and an halfe hence, where youwill be sure to remaine in safety. But you must needs travaile thitheron foot, because the nightwalkers that happened hither, have takenaway your horse with them.
4、  As I poore amorous Maide.
5、  Our King (most Noble and vertuous Ladies) hath this day given us asubject, very rough and stearne to discourse on, and so much therather, if we consider, that we are come hither to be merry andpleasant, where sad Tragicall reports are no way suteable, especially,by reviving the teares of others, to bedew our owne cheekes withall.Nor can any such argument be spoken of, without moving compassion bothin the reporters, and hearers. But (perhaps) it was his Highnessepleasure, to moderate the delights which we have already had. Orwhatsoever else hath provoked him thereto, seeing it is not lawfullfor me, to alter or contradict his appointment; I will recount anaccident very pittifull, or rather most unfortinate, and well worthyto be graced with bur teares.

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网友评论(OGbhygOS45557))

  • 唐国安 08-03

      After he had laboured by all hopefull courses, to obtaine thatfavour of her, which he had formerly lost, without any offence in him,as his innocent soule truly witnessed with him, and saw that all hisfurther endeavours were fruitlesse and in vaine; he concluded toretreate himselfe from the World, and not to be any longer irkesome inher eye, that was the onely occasion of his unhappinesse. Hereupon,storing himselfe with summes of money, as suddenly he could collecttogether, secretly he departed from Florence, without speaking anyword to his friends or kindred; except one kinde companion ofhis, whom he acquainted with most of his secrets, and so travelledto Ancona, where he termed himselfe by the name of Sandoloscio.Repairing to a wealthy Merchant there, he placed himselfe as hisservant, and went in a Ship of his with him to Cyprus; his actions andbehaviour proved so pleasing to the Merchant, as not onely heallowed him very sufficient wages, but also grew into such associationwith him; as he gave the most of his affaires into his hands, which heguided with such honest and discreete care, that hee himselfe (infew yeeres compasse) proved to be a rich Merchant, and of famousreport.

  • 沈耀钦 08-03

      With Cruelty,

  • 西耶娜 08-03

       THE SECOND DAY, THE SIXT NOVELL

  • 朱丽安娜·坎菲尔德 08-03

      THE THIRD DAY, THE THIRD NOVELL

  • 杨怀榕 08-02

    {  "For this, and no other reason, did I presume to use the secretcunning which now is openly made knowne unto you: and Gisippusdisposed himselfe thereunto, which otherwise hee never determined tohave done, in contracting the marriage for me, and shee consentingto me in his name.

  • 崔丽才 08-01

      Being mounted againe, and riding on further, the Gentleman duelyobserved whatsoever Rogiero spake, and comming to the passage of asmall River or Brooke: the rest of the beasts dranke, and not theMule, but staled in the River: which Signior Rogiero seeing,clapping his hands on the Mules mane, hee said. What a wicked beastart thou? thou art just like thy Master that gave thee to mee. TheGentleman committed the words to memory, as he did many otherpassing from Rogiero, riding along the rest of the day, yet none indisparagement of the King, but rather highly in his commendation.And being the next morning mounted on horseback, seeming to hold onstill the way for Tuscane: the Gentleman fulfilled the Kingscommand, causing Signior Rogiero to turne back againe with him,which willingly he yeelded to doe.}

  • 曾玉春 08-01

      By the conclusion of Pamphilus his Novel, wherein the womans readywit, at a time of such necessity, carried deserved commendations:the Queen gave command to Madam Pampinea, that she should next beginwith hers, and so she did, in this manner. In some discourses(gracious Ladies) already past among us, the truth of apparitions indreames hath partly bin approved, whereof very many have made amockery. Neverthelesse, whatsoever hath heeretofore bin sayde, Ipurpose to acquaint you with a very short Novell, of a strangeaccident happening unto a neighbour of mine, in not crediting a Dreamewhich her Husband told her.

  • 唐杰 08-01

      But,

  • 戴璐岭 07-31

       Within some short while after, the Abbot knowing the Monke to bein the Convent, and supposing him to be lately returned with the wood,determined to reprove him sharpely, and to have him closelyimprisoned, that the Damosell might remaine solie to himselfe. Andcausing him to be called presently before him, with a very stearne andangry countenance, giving him many harsh and bitter speeches,commanded, that he should be clapt in prison.

  • 康溢 07-29

    {  It came to passe, that love over-awed him in such sort, as he fellinto a violent sicknesse, and store of Physicions were sent for, tosave him from death, if possibly it might be. Their judgementsobserving the course of his sicknesse, yet not reaching to the causeof the disease, made a doubtfull question of his recovery; which wasso displeasing to his parents, that their griefe and sorrow grewbeyond measure. Many earnest entreaties they moved to him, to know theoccasion of his sickenesse, whereto he returned no other answere,but heart-breaking sighes, and incessant teares, which drew him moreand more into weakenesse of body.

  • 吕友明 07-29

      GOVERNMENT, OF THE HONOURABLE LADIE LAURETTA

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