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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:洪烛 大小:1SUBYgLx97877KB 下载:4azVFTXY17987次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:SjfX8IN941496条
日期:2020-08-03 12:00:57
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Penelope presently reached the oak threshold of the store room;the carpenter had planed this duly, and had drawn a line on it so asto get it quite straight; he had then set the door posts into it andhung the doors. She loosed the strap from the handle of the door,put in the key, and drove it straight home to shoot back the boltsthat held the doors; these flew open with a noise like a bullbellowing in a meadow, and Penelope stepped upon the raisedplatform, where the chests stood in which the fair linen and clotheswere laid by along with fragrant herbs: reaching thence, she took downthe bow with its bow case from the peg on which it hung. She satdown with it on her knees, weeping bitterly as she took the bow out ofits case, and when her tears had relieved her, she went to thecloister where the suitors were, carrying the bow and the quiver, withthe many deadly arrows that were inside it. Along with her came hermaidens, bearing a chest that contained much iron and bronze which herhusband had won as prizes. When she reached the suitors, she stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof of the cloister,holding a veil before her face, and with a maid on either side of her.Then she said:
2.  With these words he moved the heart of Penelope. Then Theoclymenussaid to her:
3.  "'You know that yourself, old man,' I answered, 'you will gainnothing by trying to put me off. It is because I have been kept solong in this island, and see no sign of my being able to get away. Iam losing all heart; tell me, then, for you gods know everything,which of the immortals it is that is hindering me, and tell me alsohow I may sail the sea so as to reach my home?'
4.  On this he began chopping firewood, while the others brought in afine fat five year old boar pig, and set it at the altar. Eumaeusdid not forget the gods, for he was a man of good principles, so thefirst thing he did was to cut bristles from the pig's face and throwthem into the fire, praying to all the gods as he did so thatUlysses might return home again. Then he clubbed the pig with a billetof oak which he had kept back when he was chopping the firewood, andstunned it, while the others slaughtered and singed it. Then theycut it up, and Eumaeus began by putting raw pieces from each jointon to some of the fat; these he sprinkled with barley meal, and laidupon the embers; they cut the rest of the meat up small, put thepieces upon the spits and roasted them till they were done; whenthey had taken them off the spits they threw them on to the dresser ina heap. The swineherd, who was a most equitable man, then stood upto give every one his share. He made seven portions; one of these heset apart for Mercury the son of Maia and the nymphs, praying tothem as he did so; the others he dealt out to the men man by man. Hegave Ulysses some slices cut lengthways down the loin as a mark ofespecial honour, and Ulysses was much pleased. "I hope, Eumaeus," saidhe, "that Jove will be as well disposed towards you as I am, for therespect you are showing to an outcast like myself."
5.  Thereon he gathered his clouds together, grasped his trident,stirred it round in the sea, and roused the rage of every wind thatblows till earth, sea, and sky were hidden in cloud, and nightsprang forth out of the heavens. Winds from East, South, North, andWest fell upon him all at the same time, and a tremendous sea gotup, so that Ulysses' heart began to fail him. "Alas," he said tohimself in his dismay, "what ever will become of me? I am afraidCalypso was right when she said I should have trouble by sea beforeI got back home. It is all coming true. How black is Jove makingheaven with his clouds, and what a sea the winds are raising fromevery quarter at once. I am now safe to perish. Blest and thrice blestwere those Danaans who fell before Troy in the cause of the sons ofAtreus. Would that had been killed on the day when the Trojans werepressing me so sorely about the dead body of Achilles, for then Ishould have had due burial and the Achaeans would have honoured myname; but now it seems that I shall come to a most pitiable end."
6.  Then Minerva left Scheria and went away over the sea. She went toMarathon and to the spacious streets of Athens, where she enteredthe abode of Erechtheus; but Ulysses went on to the house of Alcinous,and he pondered much as he paused a while before reaching thethreshold of bronze, for the splendour of the palace was like thatof the sun or moon. The walls on either side were of bronze from endto end, and the cornice was of blue enamel. The doors were gold, andhung on pillars of silver that rose from a floor of bronze, whilethe lintel was silver and the hook of the door was of gold.

计划指导

1.  Menelaus overheard him and said, "No one, my sons, can hold hisown with Jove, for his house and everything about him is immortal; butamong mortal men- well, there may be another who has as much wealth asI have, or there may not; but at all events I have travelled muchand have undergone much hardship, for it was nearly eight years beforeI could get home with my fleet. I went to Cyprus, Phoenicia and theEgyptians; I went also to the Ethiopians, the Sidonians, and theErembians, and to Libya where the lambs have horns as soon as they areborn, and the sheep lamb down three times a year. Every one in thatcountry, whether master or man, has plenty of cheese, meat, and goodmilk, for the ewes yield all the year round. But while I wastravelling and getting great riches among these people, my brother wassecretly and shockingly murdered through the perfidy of his wickedwife, so that I have no pleasure in being lord of all this wealth.Whoever your parents may be they must have told you about all this,and of my heavy loss in the ruin of a stately mansion fully andmagnificently furnished. Would that I had only a third of what I nowhave so that I had stayed at home, and all those were living whoperished on the plain of Troy, far from Argos. I of grieve, as I sithere in my house, for one and all of them. At times I cry aloud forsorrow, but presently I leave off again, for crying is cold comfortand one soon tires of it. Yet grieve for these as I may, I do so forone man more than for them all. I cannot even think of him withoutloathing both food and sleep, so miserable does he make me, for no oneof all the Achaeans worked so hard or risked so much as he did. Hetook nothing by it, and has left a legacy of sorrow to myself, forhe has been gone a long time, and we know not whether he is alive ordead. His old father, his long-suffering wife Penelope, and his sonTelemachus, whom he left behind him an infant in arms, are plungedin grief on his account."
2.  "I lent it him," answered Noemon, "what else could I do when a manof his position said he was in a difficulty, and asked me to obligehim? I could not possibly refuse. As for those who went with himthey were the best young men we have, and I saw Mentor go on boardas captain- or some god who was exactly like him. I cannotunderstand it, for I saw Mentor here myself yesterday morning, and yethe was then setting out for Pylos."
3.  This was what he said, and more than half raised a loud shout, andat once left the assembly. But the rest stayed where they were, forthe speech of Halitherses displeased them, and they sided withEupeithes; they therefore hurried off for their armour, and whenthey had armed themselves, they met together in front of the city, andEupeithes led them on in their folly. He thought he was going toavenge the murder of his son, whereas in truth he was never to return,but was himself to perish in his attempt.
4.  Thus he chided with his heart, and checked it into endurance, but hetossed about as one who turns a paunch full of blood and fat infront of a hot fire, doing it first on one side and then on the other,that he may get it cooked as soon as possible, even so did he turnhimself about from side to side, thinking all the time how, singlehanded as he was, he should contrive to kill so large a body of men asthe wicked suitors. But by and by Minerva came down from heaven in thelikeness of a woman, and hovered over his head saying, "My poorunhappy man, why do you lie awake in this way? This is your house:your wife is safe inside it, and so is your son who is just such ayoung man as any father may be proud of."
5.  Thus, then, the ship sped on her way through the watches of thenight from dark till dawn.
6.  Then Ulysses in his turn melted, and wept as he clasped his dear andfaithful wife to his bosom. As the sight of land is welcome to men whoare swimming towards the shore, when Neptune has wrecked their shipwith the fury of his winds and waves- a few alone reach the land,and these, covered with brine, are thankful when they findthemselves on firm ground and out of danger- even so was her husbandwelcome to her as she looked upon him, and she could not tear hertwo fair arms from about his neck. Indeed they would have gone onindulging their sorrow till rosy-fingered morn appeared, had notMinerva determined otherwise, and held night back in the far west,while she would not suffer Dawn to leave Oceanus, nor to yoke thetwo steeds Lampus and Phaethon that bear her onward to break the dayupon mankind.

推荐功能

1.  "So you are come, Telemachus, light of my eyes that you are. WhenI heard you had gone to Pylos I made sure I was never going to see youany more. Come in, my dear child, and sit down, that I may have a goodlook at you now you are home again; it is not very often you come intothe country to see us herdsmen; you stick pretty close to the towngenerally. I suppose you think it better to keep an eye on what thesuitors are doing."
2.  "Poor wretch," said she, "are you gone clean out of your mind? Goand sleep in some smithy, or place of public gossips, instead ofchattering here. Are you not ashamed of opening your mouth before yourbetters- so many of them too? Has the wine been getting into yourhead, or do you always babble in this way? You seem to have lostyour wits because you beat the tramp Irus; take care that a better manthan he does not come and cudgel you about the head till he pack youbleeding out of the house."
3.  Thus did he urge the swineherd; Eumaeus, therefore, took hissandals, bound them to his feet, and started for the town. Minervawatched him well off the station, and then came up to it in the formof a woman- fair, stately, and wise. She stood against the side of theentry, and revealed herself to Ulysses, but Telemachus could not seeher, and knew not that she was there, for the gods do not letthemselves be seen by everybody. Ulysses saw her, and so did the dogs,for they did not bark, but went scared and whining off to the otherside of the yards. She nodded her head and motioned to Ulysses withher eyebrows; whereon he left the hut and stood before her outside themain wall of the yards. Then she said to him:
4.  They turned pale with fear as he spoke, and every man looked roundabout to see whither he might fly for safety, but Eurymachus alonespoke.
5.   To this you answered, O swineherd Eumaeus, "My son, I will tellyou the real truth. He says he is a Cretan, and that he has been agreat traveller. At this moment he is running away from aThesprotian ship, and has refuge at my station, so I will put him intoyour hands. Do whatever you like with him, only remember that he isyour suppliant."
6.  "Listen to me," replied Ulysses, "and think whether Minerva andher father Jove may seem sufficient, or whether I am to try and findsome one else as well."

应用

1.  "Then I saw Alcmena, the wife of Amphitryon, who also bore to Joveindomitable Hercules; and Megara who was daughter to great King Creon,and married the redoubtable son of Amphitryon.
2.  Then Penelope sprang up from her couch, threw her arms roundEuryclea, and wept for joy. "But my dear nurse," said she, "explainthis to me; if he has really come home as you say, how did he manageto overcome the wicked suitors single handed, seeing what a numberof them there always were?"
3.  Melanthius lit the fire, and set a seat covered with sheep skinsbeside it. He also brought a great ball of lard from what they hadin the house, and the suitors warmed the bow and again made trial ofit, but they were none of them nearly strong enough to string it.Nevertheless there still remained Antinous and Eurymachus, who werethe ringleaders among the suitors and much the foremost among themall.
4、  NOW there came a certain common tramp who used to go begging allover the city of Ithaca, and was notorious as an incorrigibleglutton and drunkard. This man had no strength nor stay in him, but hewas a great hulking fellow to look at; his real name, the one hismother gave him, was Arnaeus, but the young men of the place calledhim Irus, because he used to run errands for any one who would sendhim. As soon as he came he began to insult Ulysses, and to try anddrive him out of his own house.
5、  "'Say not a word,' he answered, 'in death's favour; I would ratherbe a paid servant in a poor man's house and be above ground thanking of kings among the dead. But give me news about son; is he goneto the wars and will he be a great soldier, or is this not so? Tell mealso if you have heard anything about my father Peleus- does hestill rule among the Myrmidons, or do they show him no respectthroughout Hellas and Phthia now that he is old and his limbs failhim? Could I but stand by his side, in the light of day, with the samestrength that I had when I killed the bravest of our foes upon theplain of Troy- could I but be as I then was and go even for a shorttime to my father's house, any one who tried to do him violence orsupersede him would soon me it.'

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网友评论(FKIVn0KN79175))

  • 潘石屹 08-02

      There, then, they left him in very cruel bondage, and having puton their armour they closed the door behind them and went back to taketheir places by the side of Ulysses; whereon the four men stood in thecloister, fierce and full of fury; nevertheless, those who were in thebody of the court were still both brave and many. Then Jove's daughterMinerva came up to them, having assumed the voice and form ofMentor. Ulysses was glad when he saw her and said, "Mentor, lend meyour help, and forget not your old comrade, nor the many good turns hehas done you. Besides, you are my age-mate."

  • 马晴燕 08-02

      Ulysses was glad when he heard the omens conveyed to him by thewoman's speech, and by the thunder, for he knew they meant that heshould avenge himself on the suitors.

  • 蒲世赛 08-02

       "Madam," answered Ulysses, "it is such a long time ago that I canhardly say. Twenty years are come and gone since he left my home,and went elsewhither; but I will tell you as well as I canrecollect. Ulysses wore a mantle of purple wool, double lined, andit was fastened by a gold brooch with two catches for the pin. Onthe face of this there was a device that showed a dog holding aspotted fawn between his fore paws, and watching it as it laypanting upon the ground. Every one marvelled at the way in which thesethings had been done in gold, the dog looking at the fawn, andstrangling it, while the fawn was struggling convulsively to escape.As for the shirt that he wore next his skin, it was so soft that itfitted him like the skin of an onion, and glistened in the sunlight tothe admiration of all the women who beheld it. Furthermore I say,and lay my saying to your heart, that I do not know whether Ulysseswore these clothes when he left home, or whether one of his companionshad given them to him while he was on his voyage; or possibly some oneat whose house he was staying made him a present of them, for he was aman of many friends and had few equals among the Achaeans. I myselfgave him a sword of bronze and a beautiful purple mantle, doublelined, with a shirt that went down to his feet, and I sent him onboard his ship with every mark of honour. He had a servant with him, alittle older than himself, and I can tell you what he was like; hisshoulders were hunched, he was dark, and he had thick curly hair.His name was Eurybates, and Ulysses treated him with greaterfamiliarity than he did any of the others, as being the mostlike-minded with himself."

  • 张丕民 08-02

      They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'

  • 黄春辉 08-01

    {  She went wondering back into the house, and laid her son's saying inher heart. Then going upstairs with her handmaids into her room, shemourned her dear husband till Minerva sent sweet sleep over hereyelids.

  • 辛涛 07-31

      "Father Jove," said she, "and all you other gods that live ineverlasting bliss, I hope there may never be such a thing as a kindand well-disposed ruler any more, nor one who will govern equitably. Ihope they will be all henceforth cruel and unjust, for there is notone of his subjects but has forgotten Ulysses, who ruled them asthough he were their father. There he is, lying in great pain in anisland where dwells the nymph Calypso, who will not let him go; and hecannot get back to his own country, for he can find neither shipsnor sailors to take him over the sea. Furthermore, wicked people arenow trying to murder his only son Telemachus, who is coming homefrom Pylos and Lacedaemon, where he has been to see if he can get newsof his father."}

  • 赫瓦贾·穆因丁·奇什蒂 07-31

      On this Eumaeus took his seat again, and when he had finished hisdinner he left the courts and the cloister with the men at table,and went back to his pigs. As for the suitors, they presently began toamuse themselves with singing and dancing, for it was now getting ontowards evening.

  • 韩泽祥 07-31

      Thus spoke Minerva, and Ulysses obeyed her gladly. Then Minervaassumed the form and voice of Mentor, and presently made a covenant ofpeace between the two contending parties.

  • 平冈昭利 07-30

       Thus did they converse, and meanwhile the ship which had broughtTelemachus and his crew from Pylos had reached the town of Ithaca.When they had come inside the harbour they drew the ship on to theland; their servants came and took their armour from them, and theyleft all the presents at the house of Clytius. Then they sent aservant to tell Penelope that Telemachus had gone into the country,but had sent the ship to the town to prevent her from being alarmedand made unhappy. This servant and Eumaeus happened to meet whenthey were both on the same errand of going to tell Penelope. When theyreached the House, the servant stood up and said to the queen in thepresence of the waiting women, "Your son, Madam, is now returnedfrom Pylos"; but Eumaeus went close up to Penelope, and said privatelythat her son had given bidden him tell her. When he had given hismessage he left the house with its outbuildings and went back to hispigs again.

  • 玛德琳 07-28

    {  Then Ulysses said: "Pray, Alcinous, do not take any such notion intoyour head. I have nothing of the immortal about me, neither in bodynor mind, and most resemble those among you who are the mostafflicted. Indeed, were I to tell you all that heaven has seen fitto lay upon me, you would say that I was still worse off than theyare. Nevertheless, let me sup in spite of sorrow, for an empty stomachis a very importunate thing, and thrusts itself on a man's notice nomatter how dire is his distress. I am in great trouble, yet it insiststhat I shall eat and drink, bids me lay aside all memory of my sorrowsand dwell only on the due replenishing of itself. As for yourselves,do as you propose, and at break of day set about helping me to gethome. I shall be content to die if I may first once more behold myproperty, my bondsmen, and all the greatness of my house."

  • 李锰 07-28

      THUS, then, did Ulysses wait and pray; but the girl drove on tothe town. When she reached her father's house she drew up at thegateway, and her brothers- comely as the gods- gathered round her,took the mules out of the waggon, and carried the clothes into thehouse, while she went to her own room, where an old servant,Eurymedusa of Apeira, lit the fire for her. This old woman had beenbrought by sea from Apeira, and had been chosen as a prize forAlcinous because he was king over the Phaecians, and the people obeyedhim as though he were a god. She had been nurse to Nausicaa, and hadnow lit the fire for her, and brought her supper for her into herown room.

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