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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:艾德莱斯 大小:qknowuWL15381KB 下载:zrWgree317589次
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日期:2020-08-07 00:50:05
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Now when the sun had set and darkness was over the land.
2.  Laertes answered, "Would, by Father Jove, Minerva, and Apollo,that I were the man I was when I ruled among the Cephallenians, andtook Nericum, that strong fortress on the foreland. If I were stillwhat I then was and had been in our house yesterday with my armour on,I should have been able to stand by you and help you against thesuitors. I should have killed a great many of them, and you would haverejoiced to see it."
3.  "Then he dived under the sea, and she in due course bore Peliasand Neleus, who both of them served Jove with all their might.Pelias was a great breeder of sheep and lived in Iolcus, but the otherlived in Pylos. The rest of her children were by Cretheus, namely,Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon, who was a mighty warrior and charioteer.
4.  As he was thus speaking a bird flew on his right hand- an eagle witha great white goose in its talons which it had carried off from thefarm yard- and all the men and women were running after it andshouting. It came quite close up to them and flew away on theirright hands in front of the horses. When they saw it they were glad,and their hearts took comfort within them, whereon Pisistratus said,"Tell me, Menelaus, has heaven sent this omen for us or for you?"
5.  "Now to this place there came some cunning traders from Phoenicia(for the Phoenicians are great mariners) in a ship which they hadfreighted with gewgaws of all kinds. There happened to be a Phoenicianwoman in my father's house, very tall and comely, and an excellentservant; these scoundrels got hold of her one day when she was washingnear their ship, seduced her, and cajoled her in ways that no womancan resist, no matter how good she may be by nature. The man who hadseduced her asked her who she was and where she came from, and onthis she told him her father's name. 'I come from Sidon,' said she,'and am daughter to Arybas, a man rolling in wealth. One day as Iwas coming into the town from the country some Taphian piratesseized me and took me here over the sea, where they sold me to the manwho owns this house, and he gave them their price for me.'
6.  Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.

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1.  And Penelope answered, "Stranger, dreams are very curious andunaccountable things, and they do not by any means invariably cometrue. There are two gates through which these unsubstantial fanciesproceed; the one is of horn, and the other ivory. Those that comethrough the gate of ivory are fatuous, but those from the gate of hornmean something to those that see them. I do not think, however, thatmy own dream came through the gate of horn, though I and my son shouldbe most thankful if it proves to have done so. Furthermore I say-and lay my saying to your heart- the coming dawn will usher in theill-omened day that is to sever me from the house of Ulysses, for I amabout to hold a tournament of axes. My husband used to set up twelveaxes in the court, one in front of the other, like the stays uponwhich a ship is built; he would then go back from them and shoot anarrow through the whole twelve. I shall make the suitors try to do thesame thing, and whichever of them can string the bow most easily,and send his arrow through all the twelve axes, him will I follow, andquit this house of my lawful husband, so goodly and so abounding inwealth. But even so, I doubt not that I shall remember it in mydreams."
2.  Telemachus saw her long before any one else did. He was sittingmoodily among the suitors thinking about his brave father, and howhe would send them flying out of the house, if he were to come tohis own again and be honoured as in days gone by. Thus brooding ashe sat among them, he caught sight of Minerva and went straight to thegate, for he was vexed that a stranger should be kept waiting foradmittance. He took her right hand in his own, and bade her give himher spear. "Welcome," said he, "to our house, and when you havepartaken of food you shall tell us what you have come for."
3.  "Offer a prayer, sir," said he, "to King Neptune, for it is hisfeast that you are joining; when you have duly prayed and made yourdrink-offering, pass the cup to your friend that he may do so also.I doubt not that he too lifts his hands in prayer, for man cannot livewithout God in the world. Still he is younger than you are, and ismuch of an age with myself, so I he handed I will give you theprecedence."
4.  Thus sang the bard, and both Ulysses and the seafaring Phaeacianswere charmed as they heard him.
5.  "Thence we sailed sadly on till the men were worn out with longand fruitless rowing, for there was no longer any wind to help them.Six days, night and day did we toil, and on the seventh day we reachedthe rocky stronghold of Lamus- Telepylus, the city of theLaestrygonians, where the shepherd who is driving in his sheep andgoats [to be milked] salutes him who is driving out his flock [tofeed] and this last answers the salute. In that country a man whocould do without sleep might earn double wages, one as a herdsman ofcattle, and another as a shepherd, for they work much the same bynight as they do by day.
6.  "'Is there no way,' said I, 'of escaping Charybdis, and at thesame time keeping Scylla off when she is trying to harm my men?'

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1.  But all the time he felt sure it was Minerva, and the suitors fromthe other side raised an uproar when they saw her. Agelaus was thefirst to reproach her. "Mentor," he cried, "do not let Ulysses beguileyou into siding with him and fighting the suitors. This is what wewill do: when we have killed these people, father and son, we willkill you too. You shall pay for it with your head, and when we havekilled you, we will take all you have, in doors or out, and bring itinto hotch-pot with Ulysses' property; we will not let your sonslive in your house, nor your daughters, nor shall your widowcontinue to live in the city of Ithaca."
2.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
3.  "Thus, then, did we sit and hold sad talk with one another, I on theone side of the trench with my sword held over the blood, and theghost of my comrade saying all this to me from the other side. Thencame the ghost of my dead mother Anticlea, daughter to Autolycus. Ihad left her alive when I set out for Troy and was moved to tears whenI saw her, but even so, for all my sorrow I would not let her comenear the blood till I had asked my questions of Teiresias.
4.  Then Telemachus spoke. "Great heavens!" he exclaimed, "Jove musthave robbed me of my senses. Here is my dear and excellent mothersaying she will quit this house and marry again, yet I am laughing andenjoying myself as though there were nothing happening. But,suitors, as the contest has been agreed upon, let it go forward. It isfor a woman whose peer is not to be found in Pylos, Argos, orMycene, nor yet in Ithaca nor on the mainland. You know this as wellas I do; what need have I to speak in praise of my mother? Come on,then, make no excuses for delay, but let us see whether you can stringthe bow or no. I too will make trial of it, for if I can string it andshoot through the iron, I shall not suffer my mother to quit thishouse with a stranger, not if I can win the prizes which my father wonbefore me."
5.   "I am by birth a Cretan; my father was a well-to-do man, who hadmany sons born in marriage, whereas I was the son of a slave whom hehad purchased for a concubine; nevertheless, my father Castor son ofHylax (whose lineage I claim, and who was held in the highest honouramong the Cretans for his wealth, prosperity, and the valour of hissons) put me on the same level with my brothers who had been born inwedlock. When, however, death took him to the house of Hades, his sonsdivided his estate and cast lots for their shares, but to me they gavea holding and little else; nevertheless, my valour enabled me to marryinto a rich family, for I was not given to bragging, or shirking onthe field of battle. It is all over now; still, if you look at thestraw you can see what the ear was, for I have had trouble enoughand to spare. Mars and Minerva made me doughty in war; when I hadpicked my men to surprise the enemy with an ambuscade I never gavedeath so much as a thought, but was the first to leap forward andspear all whom I could overtake. Such was I in battle, but I did notcare about farm work, nor the frugal home life of those who wouldbring up children. My delight was in ships, fighting, javelins, andarrows- things that most men shudder to think of; but one man likesone thing and another another, and this was what I was mostnaturally inclined to. Before the Achaeans went to Troy, nine timeswas I in command of men and ships on foreign service, and I amassedmuch wealth. I had my pick of the spoil in the first instance, andmuch more was allotted to me later on.
6.  "'Stay where you are, then, 'answered I, 'eating and drinking at theship, but I must go, for I am most urgently bound to do so.'

应用

1.  "But why," said Ulysses, "did you not tell him, for you knew allabout it? Did you want him too to go sailing about amid all kinds ofhardship while others are eating up his estate?"
2.  "There it was that I heard news of Ulysses, for the king told mehe had entertained him, and shown him much hospitality while he was onhis homeward journey. He showed me also the treasure of gold, andwrought iron that Ulysses had got together. There was enough to keephis family for ten generations, so much had he left in the house ofking Pheidon. But the king said Ulysses had gone to Dodona that hemight learn Jove's mind from the god's high oak tree, and know whetherafter so long an absence he should return to Ithaca openly, or insecret. Moreover the king swore in my presence, making drink-offeringsin his own house as he did so, that the ship was by the water side,and the crew found, that should take him to his own country. He sentme off however before Ulysses returned, for there happened to be aThesprotian ship sailing for the wheat-growing island of Dulichium,and he told those in charge of her to be sure and take me safely toKing Acastus.
3.  "'You will now come to the Thrinacian island, and here you willsee many herds of cattle and flocks of sheep belonging to the sun-god-seven herds of cattle and seven flocks of sheep, with fifty head ineach flock. They do not breed, nor do they become fewer in number, andthey are tended by the goddesses Phaethusa and Lampetie, who arechildren of the sun-god Hyperion by Neaera. Their mother when shehad borne them and had done suckling them sent them to theThrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and lookafter their father's flocks and herds. If you leave these flocksunharmed, and think of nothing but getting home, you may yet aftermuch hardship reach Ithaca; but if you harm them, then I forewarnyou of the destruction both of your ship and of your comrades; andeven though you may yourself escape, you will return late, in badplight, after losing all your men.'
4、  "'Son of Atreus,' he answered, 'why ask me? You had better notknow what I can tell you, for your eyes will surely fill when you haveheard my story. Many of those about whom you ask are dead and gone,but many still remain, and only two of the chief men among theAchaeans perished during their return home. As for what happened onthe field of battle- you were there yourself. A third Achaean leaderis still at sea, alive, but hindered from returning. Ajax was wrecked,for Neptune drove him on to the great rocks of Gyrae; nevertheless, helet him get safe out of the water, and in spite of all Minerva'shatred he would have escaped death, if he had not ruined himself byboasting. He said the gods could not drown him even though they hadtried to do so, and when Neptune heard this large talk, he seizedhis trident in his two brawny hands, and split the rock of Gyrae intwo pieces. The base remained where it was, but the part on which Ajaxwas sitting fell headlong into the sea and carried Ajax with it; so hedrank salt water and was drowned.
5、  "Sir, and all of you, farewell. Make your drink-offerings and sendme on my way rejoicing, for you have fulfilled my heart's desire bygiving me an escort, and making me presents, which heaven grant that Imay turn to good account; may I find my admirable wife living in peaceamong friends, and may you whom I leave behind me give satisfaction toyour wives and children; may heaven vouchsafe you every good grace,and may no evil thing come among your people."

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  • 罗兢肖 08-06

      "Then I said, 'I wish I could be as sure of killing you outright andsending you down to the house of Hades, as I am that it will take morethan Neptune to cure that eye of yours.'

  • 胡延美 08-06

      The others all agreed, but Ulysses, to throw them off the scent,said, "Sirs, an old man like myself, worn out with suffering, cannothold his own against a young one; but my irrepressible belly urgesme on, though I know it can only end in my getting a drubbing. Youmust swear, however that none of you will give me a foul blow tofavour Irus and secure him the victory."

  • 解辰巽 08-06

       "You are quite right, Laodamas," replied Euryalus, "go up to yourguest and speak to him about it yourself."

  • 贺波 08-06

      "Son of Atreus," replied Telemachus, "do not press me to staylonger; I should be contented to remain with you for another twelvemonths; I find your conversation so delightful that I should neveronce wish myself at home with my parents; but my crew whom I have leftat Pylos are already impatient, and you are detaining me from them. Asfor any present you may be disposed to make me, I had rather that itshould he a piece of plate. I will take no horses back with me toIthaca, but will leave them to adorn your own stables, for you havemuch flat ground in your kingdom where lotus thrives, as alsomeadowsweet and wheat and barley, and oats with their white andspreading ears; whereas in Ithaca we have neither open fields norracecourses, and the country is more fit for goats than horses, andI like it the better for that. None of our islands have much levelground, suitable for horses, and Ithaca least of all."

  • 屈宏斌 08-05

    {  BOOK XIV.

  • 黄初平 08-04

      BOOK XV.}

  • 傅静君 08-04

      Leiodes then caught the knees of Ulysses and said, "Ulysses Ibeseech you have mercy upon me and spare me. I never wronged any ofthe women in your house either in word or deed, and I tried to stopthe others. I saw them, but they would not listen, and now they arepaying for their folly. I was their sacrificing priest; if you killme, I shall die without having done anything to deserve it, andshall have got no thanks for all the good that I did."

  • 綦江区 08-04

      But Minerva would not let the suitors for one moment cease theirinsolence, for she wanted Ulysses to become even more bitter againstthem; she therefore set Eurymachus son of Polybus on to gibe at him,which made the others laugh. "Listen to me," said he, "you suitorsof Queen Penelope, that I may speak even as I am minded. It is not fornothing that this man has come to the house of Ulysses; I believethe light has not been coming from the torches, but from his own head-for his hair is all gone, every bit of it."

  • 托特纳姆 08-03

       "May it be even so," answered Penelope; "if your words come true,you shall have such gifts and such good will from me that all whosee you shall congratulate you."

  • 完雅楠 08-01

    {  Presently the sun set and darkness was over all the land. The vesselmade a quick pass sage to Pheae and thence on to Elis, where theEpeans rule. Telemachus then headed her for the flying islands,wondering within himself whether he should escape death or should betaken prisoner.

  • 坎坎 08-01

      Then turning to Antinous he said, "Antinous, you take as much careof my interests as though I were your son. Why should you want tosee this stranger turned out of the house? Heaven forbid; take'something and give it him yourself; I do not grudge it; I bid you takeit. Never mind my mother, nor any of the other servants in thehouse; but I know you will not do what I say, for you are more fond ofeating things yourself than of giving them to other people."

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