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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:佐洛娃 大小:IKkArG5D98586KB 下载:cZaa5DJw68180次
版本:v57705 系统:Android3.8.x以上 好评:oM5dJIMk87529条
日期:2020-08-06 13:10:15
安卓
朱玉琳

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
2.  "On this he lifted up his hands to the firmament of heaven andprayed, saying, 'Hear me, great Neptune; if I am indeed your owntrue-begotten son, grant that Ulysses may never reach his homealive; or if he must get back to his friends at last, let him do solate and in sore plight after losing all his men [let him reach hishome in another man's ship and find trouble in his house.']
3.  Ulysses looked sternly at him and answered, "If you were theirsacrificing priest, you must have prayed many a time that it mightbe long before I got home again, and that you might marry my wifeand have children by her. Therefore you shall die."
4.  Then she called her maids and said, "Stay where you are, yougirls. Can you not see a man without running away from him? Do youtake him for a robber or a murderer? Neither he nor any one else cancome here to do us Phaeacians any harm, for we are dear to the gods,and live apart on a land's end that juts into the sounding sea, andhave nothing to do with any other people. This is only some poor manwho has lost his way, and we must be kind to him, for strangers andforeigners in distress are under Jove's protection, and will take whatthey can get and be thankful; so, girls, give the poor fellowsomething to eat and drink, and wash him in the stream at some placethat is sheltered from the wind."
5.  "I have come, sir replied Telemachus, "to see if you can tell meanything about my father. I am being eaten out of house and home; myfair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants whokeep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence ofpaying their addresses to my mother. Therefore, I am suppliant at yourknees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller; for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactlywhat you saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal serviceeither by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by theTrojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."
6.  The suitors then returned to their singing and dancing until theevening; but when night fell upon their pleasuring they went home tobed each in his own abode. Telemachus's room was high up in a towerthat looked on to the outer court; hither, then, he hied, brooding andfull of thought. A good old woman, Euryclea, daughter of Ops, theson of Pisenor, went before him with a couple of blazing torches.Laertes had bought her with his own money when she was quite young; hegave the worth of twenty oxen for her, and shewed as much respect toher in his household as he did to his own wedded wife, but he didnot take her to his bed for he feared his wife's resentment. She itwas who now lighted Telemachus to his room, and she loved him betterthan any of the other women in the house did, for she had nursed himwhen he was a baby. He opened the door of his bed room and sat downupon the bed; as he took off his shirt he gave it to the good oldwoman, who folded it tidily up, and hung it for him over a peg byhis bed side, after which she went out, pulled the door to by a silvercatch, and drew the bolt home by means of the strap. But Telemachus ashe lay covered with a woollen fleece kept thinking all night throughof his intended voyage of the counsel that Minerva had given him.

计划指导

1.  When Ulysses heard this he put the lid on the chest and made it fastwith a bond that Circe had taught him. He had done so before anupper servant told him to come to the bath and wash himself. He wasvery glad of a warm bath, for he had had no one to wait upon himever since he left the house of Calypso, who as long as he remainedwith her had taken as good care of him as though he had been a god.When the servants had done washing and anointing him with oil, and hadgiven him a clean cloak and shirt, he left the bath room and joinedthe guests who were sitting over their wine. Lovely Nausicaa stoodby one of the bearing-posts supporting the roof if the cloister, andadmired him as she saw him pass. "Farewell stranger," said she, "donot forget me when you are safe at home again, for it is to me firstthat you owe a ransom for having saved your life."
2.  They all held their peace till at last Agelaus son of Damastor said,"No one should take offence at what has just been said, nor gainsayit, for it is quite reasonable. Leave off, therefore, ill-treating thestranger, or any one else of the servants who are about the house; Iwould say, however, a friendly word to Telemachus and his mother,which I trust may commend itself to both. 'As long,' I would say,'as you had ground for hoping that Ulysses would one day come home, noone could complain of your waiting and suffering the suitors to bein your house. It would have been better that he should have returned,but it is now sufficiently clear that he will never do so; thereforetalk all this quietly over with your mother, and tell her to marry thebest man, and the one who makes her the most advantageous offer.Thus you will yourself be able to manage your own inheritance, andto eat and drink in peace, while your mother will look after someother man's house, not yours."'
3.  With these words he sat down, and Mentor who had been a friend ofUlysses, and had been left in charge of everything with full authorityover the servants, rose to speak. He, then, plainly and in all honestyaddressed them thus:
4.  Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."
5.  Then they roasted the outer meat, drew it off the spits, gaveevery man his portion, and feasted to their hearts' content; those whowaited at table gave Ulysses exactly the same portion as the othershad, for Telemachus had told them to do so.
6.  Telemachus answered, "The fault, father, is mine, and mine only; Ileft the store room door open, and they have kept a sharper look outthan I have. Go, Eumaeus, put the door to, and see whether it is oneof the women who is doing this, or whether, as I suspect, it isMelanthius the son of Dolius."

推荐功能

1.  The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."
2.  BUT as the sun was rising from the fair sea into the firmament ofheaven to shed Blight on mortals and immortals, they reached Pylos thecity of Neleus. Now the people of Pylos were gathered on the sea shoreto offer sacrifice of black bulls to Neptune lord of the Earthquake.There were nine guilds with five hundred men in each, and there werenine bulls to each guild. As they were eating the inward meats andburning the thigh bones [on the embers] in the name of Neptune,Telemachus and his crew arrived, furled their sails, brought theirship to anchor, and went ashore.
3.  With these words she flew away like a bird into the air, but she hadgiven Telemachus courage, and had made him think more than everabout his father. He felt the change, wondered at it, and knew thatthe stranger had been a god, so he went straight to where thesuitors were sitting.
4.  "Then he dived under the sea, and she in due course bore Peliasand Neleus, who both of them served Jove with all their might.Pelias was a great breeder of sheep and lived in Iolcus, but the otherlived in Pylos. The rest of her children were by Cretheus, namely,Aeson, Pheres, and Amythaon, who was a mighty warrior and charioteer.
5.   Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"
6.  Telemachus answered boldly, for Minerva had given him courage to askabout his father and get himself a good name.

应用

1.  "'Stranger,' replied she, 'I will make it all quite clear to you.There is an old immortal who lives under the sea hereabouts andwhose name is Proteus. He is an Egyptian, and people say he is myfather; he is Neptune's head man and knows every inch of ground allover the bottom of the sea. If you can snare him and hold him tight,he will tell you about your voyage, what courses you are to take,and how you are to sail the sea so as to reach your home. He will alsotell you, if you so will, all that has been going on at your houseboth good and bad, while you have been away on your long and dangerousjourney.'
2.  "Father Jove," he cried, "and all you other blessed gods who livefor ever, come here and see the ridiculous and disgraceful sightthat I will show you. Jove's daughter Venus is always dishonouringme because I am lame. She is in love with Mars, who is handsome andclean built, whereas I am a cripple- but my parents are to blame forthat, not I; they ought never to have begotten me. Come and see thepair together asleep on my bed. It makes me furious to look at them.They are very fond of one another, but I do not think they will liethere longer than they can help, nor do I think that they will sleepmuch; there, however, they shall stay till her father has repaid methe sum I gave him for his baggage of a daughter, who is fair butnot honest."
3.  As he spoke he went inside the buildings to the cloister where thesuitors were, but Argos died as soon as he had recognized his master.
4、  "'What ails you, Polyphemus,' said they, 'that you make such anoise, breaking the stillness of the night, and preventing us frombeing able to sleep? Surely no man is carrying off your sheep?Surely no man is trying to kill you either by fraud or by force?
5、  On this he handed them a piece of fat roast loin, which had been setnear him as being a prime part, and they laid their hands on thegood things that were before them; as soon as they had had enough toeat and drink, Telemachus said to the son of Nestor, with his headso close that no one might hear, "Look, Pisistratus, man after myown heart, see the gleam of bronze and gold- of amber, ivory, andsilver. Everything is so splendid that it is like seeing the palace ofOlympian Jove. I am lost in admiration."

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  • 余清 08-05

      They gathered round the ghost of the son of Peleus, and the ghost ofAgamemnon joined them, sorrowing bitterly. Round him were gatheredalso the ghosts of those who had perished with him in the house ofAeisthus; and the ghost of Achilles spoke first.

  • 邹家骅 08-05

      And Ulysses said, "I am no god, why should you take me for one? I amyour father, on whose account you grieve and suffer so much at thehands of lawless men."

  • 王作东 08-05

       Then Telemachus said, "Mother, I am the only man either in Ithaca orin the islands that are over against Elis who has the right to let anyone have the bow or to refuse it. No one shall force me one way or theother, not even though I choose to make the stranger a present ofthe bow outright, and let him take it away with him. Go, then,within the house and busy yourself with your daily duties, yourloom, your distaff, and the ordering of your servants. This bow is aman's matter, and mine above all others, for it is I who am masterhere."

  • 彭某称 08-05

      He found her at home. There was a large fire burning on thehearth, and one could smell from far the fragrant reek of burningcedar and sandal wood. As for herself, she was busy at her loom,shooting her golden shuttle through the warp and singingbeautifully. Round her cave there was a thick wood of alder, poplar,and sweet smelling cypress trees, wherein all kinds of great birds hadbuilt their nests- owls, hawks, and chattering sea-crows that occupytheir business in the waters. A vine loaded with grapes was trainedand grew luxuriantly about the mouth of the cave; there were also fourrunning rills of water in channels cut pretty close together, andturned hither and thither so as to irrigate the beds of violets andluscious herbage over which they flowed. Even a god could not helpbeing charmed with such a lovely spot, so Mercury stood still andlooked at it; but when he had admired it sufficiently he went insidethe cave.

  • 毕磊 08-04

    {  "I have come, sir replied Telemachus, "to see if you can tell meanything about my father. I am being eaten out of house and home; myfair estate is being wasted, and my house is full of miscreants whokeep killing great numbers of my sheep and oxen, on the pretence ofpaying their addresses to my mother. Therefore, I am suppliant at yourknees if haply you may tell me about my father's melancholy end,whether you saw it with your own eyes, or heard it from some othertraveller; for he was a man born to trouble. Do not soften thingsout of any pity for myself, but tell me in all plainness exactlywhat you saw. If my brave father Ulysses ever did you loyal serviceeither by word or deed, when you Achaeans were harassed by theTrojans, bear it in mind now as in my favour and tell me truly all."

  • 木婉清 08-03

      "Their hearts sank as they heard me, for they remembered how theyhad been treated by the Laestrygonian Antiphates, and by the savageogre Polyphemus. They wept bitterly in their dismay, but there wasnothing to be got by crying, so I divided them into two companiesand set a captain over each; I gave one company to Eurylochus, while Itook command of the other myself. Then we cast lots in a helmet, andthe lot fell upon Eurylochus; so he set out with his twenty-two men,and they wept, as also did we who were left behind.}

  • 王漫琪 08-03

      So here Ulysses stood for a while and looked about him, but whenhe had looked long enough he crossed the threshold and went within theprecincts of the house. There he found all the chief people amongthe Phaecians making their drink-offerings to Mercury, which theyalways did the last thing before going away for the night. He wentstraight through the court, still hidden by the cloak of darkness inwhich Minerva had enveloped him, till he reached Arete and KingAlcinous; then he laid his hands upon the knees of the queen, and atthat moment the miraculous darkness fell away from him and he becamevisible. Every one was speechless with surprise at seeing a man there,but Ulysses began at once with his petition.

  • 李秋欢 08-03

      The immortal gods burst out laughing as they heard him, butNeptune took it all seriously, and kept on imploring Vulcan to setMars free again. "Let him go," he cried, "and I will undertake, as yourequire, that he shall pay you all the damages that are heldreasonable among the immortal gods."

  • 法兰西斯 08-02

       "At any other time," replied Telemachus, "I should have bidden yougo to my own house, for you would find no want of hospitality; atthe present moment, however, you would not be comfortable there, for Ishall be away, and my mother will not see you; she does not often showherself even to the suitors, but sits at her loom weaving in anupper chamber, out of their way; but I can tell you a man whosehouse you can go to- I mean Eurymachus the son of Polybus, who is heldin the highest estimation by every one in Ithaca. He is much thebest man and the most persistent wooer, of all those who are payingcourt to my mother and trying to take Ulysses' place. Jove, however,in heaven alone knows whether or no they will come to a bad end beforethe marriage takes place."

  • 吴渤志 07-31

    {  At this moment the bow was in the hands of Eurymachus, who waswarming it by the fire, but even so he could not string it, and he wasgreatly grieved. He heaved a deep sigh and said, "I grieve formyself and for us all; I grieve that I shall have to forgo themarriage, but I do not care nearly so much about this, for there areplenty of other women in Ithaca and elsewhere; what I feel most is thefact of our being so inferior to Ulysses in strength that we cannotstring his bow. This will disgrace us in the eyes of those who are yetunborn."

  • 马万里 07-31

      On this pale fear laid hold of them, and old Halitherses, son ofMastor, rose to speak, for he was the only man among them who knewboth past and future; so he spoke to them plainly and in allhonesty, saying,

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