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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:黄秀凤 大小:2J0yPrCv42546KB 下载:FrxKw8Q173850次
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日期:2020-08-07 01:50:27
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郭卫民

1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Somtime (faire Ladies) there lived in Arimino, a Merchant, very richin wealth and worldly possessions, who having a beautifull Gentlewomanto his wife, he became extreamly jelous of her. And he had no otherreason for this foolish conceit; but, like as he loved hir dearly, andfound her to be very absolutely faire: even so he imagined, thatalthogh she devised by her best meanes to give him content; yet otherswould grow enamored of her, because she appeared so amiable to al.In which respect, time might tutor her to affect some other besidehimselfe: the onely common argument of every bad minded man, beingweake and shallow in his owne understanding. This jelous humorincreasing in him more and more, he kept her in such narrow restraint:that many persons condemned to death, have enoyed larger libertie intheir imprisonment. For, she might not bee present at Feasts,Weddings, nor goe to Church, or so much as to be seen at her doore:Nay, she durst not stand in her Window, nor looke out of her house,for any occasion whatsoever. By means whereof, life seemed mosttedious and offensive to her, and she supported it the moreimpatiently, because shee knew her selfe not any way faulty.
2.  Pedro Bocamazzo, escaping away with a yong Damosell which heloved, named Angelina, met with Theeves in his journey. The Damosellflying fearfully into a Forrest, by chance arriveth at a Castle. Pedrobeing taken by the Theeves, and happening afterward to escape fromthem; commeth (accidentally) to the same Castle where Angelina was.And marrying her, they then returned home to Rome.
3.  So soone as Madam Flammetta had ended her Song; Dioneus, who sate byher, smiling said. Truly Madam, you may do us a great courtesie, toexpresse your selfe more plainly to us all, least (thorow ignorance)the possession may be imposed on your selfe, and so you remaine themore offended.
4.  BE NOT GUILTIE OF THE SAME CRIME
5.  Most certaine it is, at least, if Faith may bee given to thereport of certaine Genewayes, and other men resorting to thoseremote parts, that in the Country of Cathaya, there lived somtime aGentleman, rich beyond comparison, and named Nathan. He having hisliving adjoyning to a great common rode-way, whereby men travayledfrom the East to the West (as they did the like from the West unto theEast, as having no other means of passage) and being of a bountifulland chearfull disposition, which he was willing to make knowen byexperience: he summoned together many Master Masons and Carpenters,and there erected (in a short time) one of the greatest, goodliest,and most beautifull houses (in manner of a Princes Pallace) thatever was seene in all those quarters.
6.  WHEREBY ALL MEN MAY PLAINELY UNDERSTAND, THAT LOYALTY

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1.  THAT TRUELY KNOW HOW TO USE THEM
2.  A physitians wife laide a Lover of her Maides (supposing him to bedead) in a Chest, by reason that he had drunke Water, which usuallywas given to procure a sleepy entrancing. Two Lombard usurers,stealing the Chest, in hope of a rich booty, carryed it into theirowne house, where afterward the man awaking, was apprehended for aTheefe. The Chamber-maide to the Physitians wife, going before thebench of Justice, accuseth her selfe for putting the imagined deadbody into the Chest, by which meanes he escapeth hanging. And thetheeves which stole away the Chest, were condemned to pay a greatsumme of money.
3.  I hate all such as do complaine,
4.  HAND OF HEAVEN, WHEN FORTUNE SEEMETH TO BE MOST
5.  Madam, I have often heard it said, that one Cocke may doe service toten several Hennes, but ten men can very hardly even with all theirbest endeavour, give full satisfaction every way to one woman; and yetI am tied to content nine, which is farre beyond the compasse of mypower to do. Already have I performed so much Garden and Chamber-work,that I confesse my selfe starke tired, and can travaile no further,and therefore let me entreate you to lycense my departure hence, orfinde some meanes for my better ease. The Abbesse bearing himspeake, who had so long ben there stricken into admiration, andaccounting it almost a miracle, said. How commeth this to passe? Iverily beleeved thee to be dumbe. Madam (quoth Massetto) so I wasindeed, but not by Nature; onely I had a long lingering sickneswhich bereft me of speech, and which I have not onely recovered againethis night, but shal ever remaine thankfull to you for it.
6.  OF THE DISCOURSES OR NOVELLS THERE TO BE RECOUNTED, DOE CONCERNE

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1.  In the meane while, Madame Helena remaining still on the Tower,began to comfort her selfe with a little vaine hope, yet sighing andweeping incessantly, seating her selfe so well as shee could, whereany small shelter might yeelde the least shade, in expectation ofthe Schollers returning: one while weeping, then againe hoping, butmost of all despairing, by his so long tarrying away with herGarments; so that beeing over-wearied with anguish and longwatching, she fell into a little slumbering. But the Sunne was soextreamly hot, the houre of noone being already past, that it meerlyparched her delicate body, and burnt her bare head so violently: asnot onely it seared all the flesh it touched; but also cleft andchinkt it strangely, beside blisters and other painfull scorchingsin the flesh which hindred her sleeping, to help her self (by allpossible means) waking. And the Turret being covered with Lead, gavethe greater addition to her torment; for, as she removed from oneplace to another, it yeelded no mitigation to the burning heate, butparched and wrinkled the flesh extraordinarily, even as when a pieceof parchment is throwne into the fire, and recovered out againe, cannever be extended to his former forme.
2.  The time being propitious for their parting thence, the Marinershoised their sayles, leaving the port of Alexandria, and saylingprosperously many dayes together. When they had past the Countrey ofSardinia, and (as they imagined) were well neere to their journeyesend; sodainely arose boysterous and contrary windes, which were soimpetuous beyond all measure, and so tormented the Ship wherein theLady was; that the Mariners seeing no signe of comfort, gave overall hope of escaping with life. Neverthelesse, as men most expert inimplacable dangers, they laboured to their uttermost power, andcontended with infinite blustring tempests, for the space of two dayesand nights together, hoping the third day would prove more favourable.But therein they saw themselves deceyved, for the violence continuedstill, encreasing in the night time more and more, being not any wayable to comprehend either where they were, or what course theytooke, neither by Marinall judgement, or any apprehension elsewhatsoever, the heavens were so clouded, and the nights darkenesseso extreame.Beeing (unknowne to them) neere the Isle of Majorica, they felt theShippe to split in the bottome: by meanes whereof, perceiving now nohope of escaping (every one caring for himselfe, and not any other)they threw foorth a Squiffe on the troubled waves, reposing moreconfidence of safety that way, then abiding any longer in the brokenship. Howbeit such as were first descended downe, made stoutresistance against all other followers, with their drawne weapons: butsafety of life so far prevayled, that what with the Tempests violence,and over lading of the Squiffe, it sunke to the bottome, and allperished that were therein. The Ship being thus split, and more thenhalfe full of water, tossed and tormented by the blustring windes,first one way, and then another: was at last driven into a strond ofthe Isle Majorica, no other persons therein remaining, but onely theLady and her women, all of them (through the rude tempest, and theirowne conceived feare) lying still, as if they were more then halfedead. And there, within a stones cast of the neighboring shore theship (by the rough surging billowes) was fixed fast in the sands,and so continued all the rest of the night, without any furthermolestation of the windes.
3.  APPROVING, THAT IT IS MUCH UNFITTING FOR A PRINCE, OR GREAT
4.  Proceeding on still, even to the highest part of the Citie, heeespyed a Lanthorne and light, as also a man carrying it, and anotherman with him in company, both of them comming towards him. Now,because he suspected them two of the watch, or some persons that wouldapprehend him., he stept aside to shunne them, and entred into an oldehouse hard by at hand. The other mens intention was to the very sameplace; and going in, without any knowledge of Andreaes beeing there,one of them layde downe divers instruments of Iron which he hadbrought thither on his backe, and had much talke with his fellowconcerning those Engines. At last one of them saide; I smell themost abhominable stinke that ever I felt in all my life. So, liftingup the Lanthorn, he espied poore pittifull Andrea, closely couchedbehinde the wall. Which sight somewhat affrighting him, he yetboldly demaunded, what and who he was? Whereto Andrea answerednothing, but lay still and held his peace. Neerer they drew towardshim with their light, demanding how hee came thither, and in thatfilthy manner.
5.   If Love were free from jealousie, etc.
6.  The Mistresse understanding now apparantly, the full effect of thewhole businesse, and in what manner it had bene carried, revealed tothe Maide her husbands speeches, concerning the glasse of sleepieWater, which was the onely engine of all this trouble, clearlyacquitting Ruggiero of the robbery, howsoever (in desparate fury,and to make an end of a life so contemptible) he had wrongfullyaccused himselfe. And notwithstanding this his hard fortune, whichhath made him much more infamous then before, in all the dissolutebehaviour of his life: yet it could not quaile her affection towardshim; but being loath he should dye for some other mans offence, andhoping his future reformation; she fell on her knees before herMistresse, and (drowned in her teares) most earnestly entreated her,to advise her with some such happy course, as might be the safety ofpoore Ruggieroes life. Mistresse Doctor, affecting her Maidedearely, and plainely perceiving, that no disastrous fortunewhatsoever, could alter her love to condemned Ruggiero; hoping thebest hereafter, as the Maide her selfe did, and willing to save liferather then suffer it to be lost without just cause, she directedher in such discreet manner, as you will better conceive by thesuccesse.

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1.  Yet to speake uprightly of this young married Wife, she declared herselfe to be of a wise and chearfull spirit, not discoraged with herunequalitie of marriage: but bearing all with a contented browe, forfeare of urging the very least mislike in her Husband. And he, onthe other side, when occasions did not call him to visite hisPatients, or to be present at the Colledge among his fellow-Doctours,would alwayes bee chearing and comforting his Wife, as one that couldhardly affoord to be out of her company. There is one especiallfatall misfortune, which commonly awaiteth on olde Mens marriages;when freezing December will match with flourishing May, and greenedesires appeare in age, beyond all possibility of performance. Norare there wanting good store of wanton Gallants, who hating to seeBeauty in this manner betrayed, and to the embraces of a loathed bed,will make their folly seene in publike appearance, and by their dailyproffers of amorous services (seeming compassionate of the womansdisaster) are usually the cause of jealous suspitions, and veryheinous houshold discontentments.
2.  There dwelt sometime in Arezzo (which is a faire Village of Tuscany)a rich man, named Tofano, who enjoyed in marriage a young beautifullwoman, called Cheta: of whom (without any occasion given, or reasonknowne to himselfe) he became exceeding- jealous. Which his wifeperceyving, she grew much offended thereat, and tooke it in greatscorne, that she should be servile to so vile and slavish a condition.Oftentimes, she demanded of him, from whence this jealousie in himreceived originall, he having never seene or heard of any; he couldmake her no other answer, but who his owne bad humour suggested, anddrove him every day (almost) to deaths doore, by feare of that whichno way needed. But, whether as a just scourge for this his grossefolly, or a secret decree, ordained to him by Fortune and the Fates, Iam not able to distinguish: It came so to passe, that a youngGallant made meanes to enjoy her favour, and she was so discreetlywise in judging of his worthinesse; that affection passed so farremutually betweene them, as nothing wanted, but effects to answerewords, suited with time and place convenient, for which order wastaken as best they might, yet to stand free from all suspition.
3.  Eyes, when you gaz'd upon her Angell beauty;
4、  No sooner were these Princely assurances received, but a goodly shipwas prepared in the Port of Carthagena, well furnished with allthinges thereto belonging, for the sending his daughter to the King ofGranada, waiting for nothing else but best favouring windes. The youngPrincesse, who understood and saw all this great preparation; secretlysent a servant of hers to Palermo, giving him especiall charge, on herbehalfe, to salute the Prince Gerbino, and to tell him that (withinfew dayes) she must be transported to Granada. And now opportunitygave faire and free meanes, to let the world know, whether he were aman of that magnanimous spirit, or no, as generall opinion hadformerly conceived of him, and whether he affected her so firmely,as by many close messages he had assured her. He who had the charge ofthis embassie, effectually performed it, and then returned backe toThunis.
5、  Worthy Titus, if our amity would give me so much licence, as butto contend with my selfe, in pleasing thee with such a thing as Idesire, and could also induce thee therein to be directed: it is theonely end whereat I aime, and am resolved to pursue it. In whichregard, let my perswasions prevaile with thee, and thereto I conjurethee, by the faith of a friend, suffer me to use mine authority,when it extendeth both to mine owne honour, and thy good, for I willhave Sophronia to bee onely thine. I know sufficiently, how farrethe forces of love doe extend in power, and am not ignorant also,how not once or twice, but very many times, they have brought loversto unfortunate ends, as now I see thee very neere it, and so farregone, as thou art not able to turne backe againe, nor yet to conquerthine owne teares, but proceeding on further in this extremity, thouwilt be left vanquished, sinking under the burthen of lovestyrannicall oppression, and then my turne is next to follow thee.And therefore, had I no other reason to love thee, yet because thylife is deare to me, in regard of mine owne depending thereon; I standthe neerer thereto obliged. For this cause, Sophronia must and shal bethine, for thou canst not find any other so conforme to thy fancy:albeit I who can easily convert my liking to another wife, but neverto have the like friend againe, shall hereby content both thee, and myselfe.

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  • 王建文 08-06

      SINNE IN OTHER MEN, SHOULD FIRST EXAMINE HIMSELFE, THAT HE

  • 蒋琳莉 08-06

      If Love were free from Jealousie,

  • 谢家麟 08-06

       By a fountaines side:

  • 侯中金 08-06

      A comely youthfull Gentleman of our City, became amorouslyaffected to the Damosell, resorting thither divers times as heetravelled on the way, to expresse how much he did respect her. And sheaccounting her fortune none of the meanest, to bee beloved by soyouthfull a Gallant, declared such vertuous and modest demeanour, asmight deserve his best opinion of her: so that their love grew to anequall simpathy, and mutuall contentment of them both, inexpectation of further effects; he being named Panuccio, and sheNicholletta.

  • 李喜增 08-05

    {  WHEREIN IS DECLARED, THE SUNDRY TRAVELS AND PERILLOUS ACCIDENTS,

  • 董会峰 08-04

      The Soldane, being desirous to give Sicurano all manner ofsatisfaction, having followed the course so indistriously, bad himto produce the Woman, and hee was well contented. Whereat Bernardostoode much amazed, because he verity beleeved that she was dead.And Ambroginolo foreseeing already a preparation for punishment,feared, that the repayment of the money would not now serve his turne:not knowing also, what he should further hope or suspect, if the womanher selfe did personally appeare, which hee imagined would be amiracle. Sicurano having thus obtained the Soldanes permission,teares, humbling her selfe at his feete, in a moment she lost hermanly voyce and demeanour, as knowing that she was now no longer touse them, but must truly witnesse what she was indeed, and thereforethus spake.}

  • 林丽萍 08-04

      When I did follow Dyans traine,

  • 柳依依 08-04

      Philostratus, I intend not to varie from those courses heretoforeobserved by my predecessors, but even as they have already done, so itis my authority, to command a Song. And because I am well assured,that you are not unfurnished of Songs answerable to the quality of thepassed Novels: my desire is, in regard we would not be troubledhereafter, with any more discourses of unfortunate Love, that youshall sing a Song agreeing with your owne disposition. Philostratusmade answer, that hee was ready to accomplish her command, and withoutall further ceremony, thus he began.

  • 傅医生 08-03

       About Evening, and (in this manner) alone by himselfe, neere tothe Palace of Nathan, he met him solitarily walking, not in pompousapparrell, whereby to bee distinguished from a meaner man: and,because he knew him not, neyther had heard any relation of hisdescription, he demanded of him, if he knew where Nathan then was?Nathan, with a chearfull countenance, thus replyed. Faire Syr, thereis no man in these parts, that knoweth better how to shew you Nathanthen I do; and therefore, if you be so pleased, I will bring you tohim. Mithridanes said, therein he should do him a great kindnesse:albeit (if it were possible) he would bee neyther knowne nor seeneof Nathan. And that (quoth he) can I also do sufficiently for you,seeing it is your will to have it so, if you will goe along with me.

  • 李光杰 08-01

    {  Calandrino well noting, that Maso delivered all these speeches, witha stedfast countenance, no signe of smyling, or any gesture to urgethe least mislike: he gave such credit to them, as to any matter ofapparent and manifest truth, and upon this assured confidence, hesaid.

  • 夏漫宏 08-01

      Peradventure the Novell related by Madam Aemillia, did not extend itselfe so farre in length, as it mooved compassion in the Ladiesmindes, the hard fortunes of Beritol and her Children, which hadincited them to weeping: but that it pleased the Queen (upon the Talesconclusion) to command Pamphilus, to follow next in order with hisDiscourse; and he being thereto very obedient, began in this manner.

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