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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:曹庆 大小:oDIGUWYE32286KB 下载:TTl5juh696092次
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日期:2020-08-05 01:11:49
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  As he spoke day began to break, and Menelaus, who had already risen,leaving Helen in bed, came towards them. When Telemachus saw him heput on his shirt as fast as he could, threw a great cloak over hisshoulders, and went out to meet him. "Menelaus," said he, "let me goback now to my own country, for I want to get home."
2.  "Trust me for that," said she, "I will not lose sight of you whenonce we set about it, and I would imagine that some of those who aredevouring your substance will then bespatter the pavement with theirblood and brains. I will begin by disguising you so that no humanbeing shall know you; I will cover your body with wrinkles; youshall lose all your yellow hair; I will clothe you in a garment thatshall fill all who see it with loathing; I will blear your fine eyesfor you, and make you an unseemly object in the sight of thesuitors, of your wife, and of the son whom you left behind you. Thengo at once to the swineherd who is in charge of your pigs; he has beenalways well affected towards you, and is devoted to Penelope andyour son; you will find him feeding his pigs near the rock that iscalled Raven by the fountain Arethusa, where they are fattening onbeechmast and spring water after their manner. Stay with him andfind out how things are going, while I proceed to Sparta and seeyour son, who is with Menelaus at Lacedaemon, where he has gone to tryand find out whether you are still alive."
3.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.
4.  "Stockman, and you swineherd, I have something in my mind which I amin doubt whether to say or no; but I think I will say it. Whatmanner of men would you be to stand by Ulysses, if some god shouldbring him back here all of a sudden? Say which you are disposed to do-to side with the suitors, or with Ulysses?"
5.  Then Ulysses answered, "Madam wife of Ulysses, you need not deferyour tournament, for Ulysses will return ere ever they can stringthe bow, handle it how they will, and send their arrows through theiron."
6.  Then Euryalus reviled him outright and said, "I gather, then, thatyou are unskilled in any of the many sports that men generally delightin. I suppose you are one of those grasping traders that go about inships as captains or merchants, and who think of nothing but oftheir outward freights and homeward cargoes. There does not seem to bemuch of the athlete about you."

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1.  "The cruel wretch vouchsafed me not one word of answer, but with asudden clutch he gripped up two of my men at once and dashed them downupon the ground as though they had been puppies. Their brains wereshed upon the ground, and the earth was wet with their blood. Thenhe tore them limb from limb and supped upon them. He gobbled them uplike a lion in the wilderness, flesh, bones, marrow, and entrails,without leaving anything uneaten. As for us, we wept and lifted up ourhands to heaven on seeing such a horrid sight, for we did not knowwhat else to do; but when the Cyclops had filled his huge paunch,and had washed down his meal of human flesh with a drink of neat milk,he stretched himself full length upon the ground among his sheep,and went to sleep. I was at first inclined to seize my sword, draw it,and drive it into his vitals, but I reflected that if I did weshould all certainly be lost, for we should never be able to shift thestone which the monster had put in front of the door. So we stayedsobbing and sighing where we were till morning came.
2.  Meanwhile the suitors were throwing discs or aiming with spears at amark on the levelled ground in front of Ulysses' house, and werebehaving with all their old insolence. Antinous and Eurymachus, whowere their ringleaders and much the foremost among them all, weresitting together when Noemon son of Phronius came up and said toAntinous,
3.  But Penelope lay in her own room upstairs unable to eat or drink,and wondering whether her brave son would escape, or be overpowered bythe wicked suitors. Like a lioness caught in the toils with huntsmenhemming her in on every side she thought and thought till she sankinto a slumber, and lay on her bed bereft of thought and motion.
4.  Then spoke the aged hero Echeneus who was one of the oldest menamong them, "My friends," said he, "what our august queen has justsaid to us is both reasonable and to the purpose, therefore bepersuaded by it; but the decision whether in word or deed restsultimately with King Alcinous."
5.  The foot races came first. The course was set out for them fromthe starting post, and they raised a dust upon the plain as they allflew forward at the same moment. Clytoneus came in first by a longway; he left every one else behind him by the length of the furrowthat a couple of mules can plough in a fallow field. They thenturned to the painful art of wrestling, and here Euryalus proved to bethe best man. Amphialus excelled all the others in jumping, while atthrowing the disc there was no one who could approach Elatreus.Alcinous's son Laodamas was the best boxer, and he it was whopresently said, when they had all been diverted with the games, "Letus ask the stranger whether he excels in any of these sports; he seemsvery powerfully built; his thighs, claves, hands, and neck are ofprodigious strength, nor is he at all old, but he has suffered muchlately, and there is nothing like the sea for making havoc with a man,no matter how strong he is."
6.  Presently the sun set and darkness was over all the land. The vesselmade a quick pass sage to Pheae and thence on to Elis, where theEpeans rule. Telemachus then headed her for the flying islands,wondering within himself whether he should escape death or should betaken prisoner.

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1.  "After her I saw Iphimedeia wife of Aloeus who boasted the embraceof Neptune. She bore two sons Otus and Ephialtes, but both wereshort lived. They were the finest children that were ever born in thisworld, and the best looking, Orion only excepted; for at nine yearsold they were nine fathoms high, and measured nine cubits round thechest. They threatened to make war with the gods in Olympus, and triedto set Mount Ossa on the top of Mount Olympus, and Mount Pelion on thetop of Ossa, that they might scale heaven itself, and they wouldhave done it too if they had been grown up, but Apollo, son of Leto,killed both of them, before they had got so much as a sign of hairupon their cheeks or chin.
2.  "That night we rested and nursed our anger, for Jove was hatchingmischief against us. But in the morning some of us drew our ships intothe water and put our goods with our women on board, while the rest,about half in number, stayed behind with Agamemnon. We- the otherhalf- embarked and sailed; and the ships went well, for heaven hadsmoothed the sea. When we reached Tenedos we offered sacrifices to thegods, for we were longing to get home; cruel Jove, however, did notyet mean that we should do so, and raised a second quarrel in thecourse of which some among us turned their ships back again, andsailed away under Ulysses to make their peace with Agamemnon; but I,and all the ships that were with me pressed forward, for I saw thatmischief was brewing. The son of Tydeus went on also with me, andhis crews with him. Later on Menelaus joined us at Lesbos, and foundus making up our minds about our course- for we did not know whetherto go outside Chios by the island of Psyra, keeping this to ourleft, or inside Chios, over against the stormy headland of Mimas. Sowe asked heaven for a sign, and were shown one to the effect that weshould be soonest out of danger if we headed our ships across the opensea to Euboea. This we therefore did, and a fair wind sprang upwhich gave us a quick passage during the night to Geraestus, wherewe offered many sacrifices to Neptune for having helped us so far onour way. Four days later Diomed and his men stationed their ships inArgos, but I held on for Pylos, and the wind never fell light from theday when heaven first made it fair for me.
3.  So he hurried up without even taking his cloak off, and seized adisc, larger, more massive and much heavier than those used by thePhaeacians when disc-throwing among themselves. Then, swinging itback, he threw it from his brawny hand, and it made a humming sound inthe air as he did so. The Phaeacians quailed beneath the rushing ofits flight as it sped gracefully from his hand, and flew beyond anymark that had been made yet. Minerva, in the form of a man, came andmarked the place where it had fallen. "A blind man, Sir," said she,"could easily tell your mark by groping for it- it is so far aheadof any other. You may make your mind easy about this contest, for noPhaeacian can come near to such a throw as yours."
4.  Phemius was still singing, and his hearers sat rapt in silence as hetold the sad tale of the return from Troy, and the ills Minerva hadlaid upon the Achaeans. Penelope, daughter of Icarius, heard hissong from her room upstairs, and came down by the great staircase, notalone, but attended by two of her handmaids. When she reached thesuitors she stood by one of the bearing posts that supported theroof of the cloisters with a staid maiden on either side of her. Sheheld a veil, moreover, before her face, and was weeping bitterly.
5.   At last, however, Ulysses said, "Wife, we have not yet reached theend of our troubles. I have an unknown amount of toil still toundergo. It is long and difficult, but I must go through with it,for thus the shade of Teiresias prophesied concerning me, on the daywhen I went down into Hades to ask about my return and that of mycompanions. But now let us go to bed, that we may lie down and enjoythe blessed boon of sleep."
6.  Their hearts sank as they heard him, but Eurymachus again spokesaying:

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1.  "My dear nurse," said Penelope, "however wise you may be you canhardly fathom the counsels of the gods. Nevertheless, we will go insearch of my son, that I may see the corpses of the suitors, and theman who has killed them."
2.  "Listen to me," he cried, "you suitors of Queen Penelope, that I mayspeak even as I am minded. A man knows neither ache nor pain if hegets hit while fighting for his money, or for his sheep or his cattle;and even so Antinous has hit me while in the service of my miserablebelly, which is always getting people into trouble. Still, if the poorhave gods and avenging deities at all, I pray them that Antinous maycome to a bad end before his marriage."
3.  "Hear me," he cried, "daughter of Aegis-bearing Jove, unweariable,hear me now, for you gave no heed to my prayers when Neptune waswrecking me. Now, therefore, have pity upon me and grant that I mayfind friends and be hospitably received by the Phaecians."
4、  "In the end I deemed it would be the best plan to do as follows. TheCyclops had a great club which was lying near one of the sheep pens;it was of green olive wood, and he had cut it intending to use itfor a staff as soon as it should be dry. It was so huge that wecould only compare it to the mast of a twenty-oared merchant vessel oflarge burden, and able to venture out into open sea. I went up to thisclub and cut off about six feet of it; I then gave this piece to themen and told them to fine it evenly off at one end, which theyproceeded to do, and lastly I brought it to a point myself, charringthe end in the fire to make it harder. When I had done this I hid itunder dung, which was lying about all over the cave, and told themen to cast lots which of them should venture along with myself tolift it and bore it into the monster's eye while he was asleep. Thelot fell upon the very four whom I should have chosen, and I myselfmade five. In the evening the wretch came back from shepherding, anddrove his flocks into the cave- this time driving them all inside, andnot leaving any in the yards; I suppose some fancy must have takenhim, or a god must have prompted him to do so. As soon as he had putthe stone back to its place against the door, he sat down, milkedhis ewes and his goats all quite rightly, and then let each have herown young one; when he had got through with all this work, hegripped up two more of my men, and made his supper off them. So I wentup to him with an ivy-wood bowl of black wine in my hands:
5、  "You shall go to bed as soon as you please," replied Penelope,"now that the gods have sent you home to your own good house and toyour country. But as heaven has put it in your mind to speak of it,tell me about the task that lies before you. I shall have to hearabout it later, so it is better that I should be told at once."

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  • 刘海哥 08-04

      BOOK XIX.

  • 唐应茂 08-04

      She said this to try him, but Ulysses was very angry and said,"Wife, I am much displeased at what you have just been saying. Who hasbeen taking my bed from the place in which I left it? He must havefound it a hard task, no matter how skilled a workman he was, unlesssome god came and helped him to shift it. There is no man living,however strong and in his prime, who could move it from its place, forit is a marvellous curiosity which I made with my very own hands.There was a young olive growing within the precincts of the house,in full vigour, and about as thick as a bearing-post. I built myroom round this with strong walls of stone and a roof to cover them,and I made the doors strong and well-fitting. Then I cut off the topboughs of the olive tree and left the stump standing. This I dressedroughly from the root upwards and then worked with carpenter's toolswell and skilfully, straightening my work by drawing a line on thewood, and making it into a bed-prop. I then bored a hole down themiddle, and made it the centre-post of my bed, at which I workedtill I had finished it, inlaying it with gold and silver; after this Istretched a hide of crimson leather from one side of it to theother. So you see I know all about it, and I desire to learn whetherit is still there, or whether any one has been removing it bycutting down the olive tree at its roots."

  • 卡巴内 08-04

       Then Minerva said, "Father, son of Saturn, King of kings, itserved Aegisthus right, and so it would any one else who does as hedid; but Aegisthus is neither here nor there; it is for Ulysses thatmy heart bleeds, when I think of his sufferings in that lonelysea-girt island, far away, poor man, from all his friends. It is anisland covered with forest, in the very middle of the sea, and agoddess lives there, daughter of the magician Atlas, who looks afterthe bottom of the ocean, and carries the great columns that keepheaven and earth asunder. This daughter of Atlas has got hold ofpoor unhappy Ulysses, and keeps trying by every kind of blandishmentto make him forget his home, so that he is tired of life, and thinksof nothing but how he may once more see the smoke of his own chimneys.You, sir, take no heed of this, and yet when Ulysses was before Troydid he not propitiate you with many a burnt sacrifice? Why then shouldyou keep on being so angry with him?"

  • 纪劲松 08-04

      Alcinous then led the way, and the others followed after, while aservant went to fetch Demodocus. The fifty-two picked oarsmen wentto the sea shore as they had been told, and when they got there theydrew the ship into the water, got her mast and sails inside her, boundthe oars to the thole-pins with twisted thongs of leather, all indue course, and spread the white sails aloft. They moored the vessel alittle way out from land, and then came on shore and went to the houseof King Alcinous. The outhouses, yards, and all the precincts werefilled with crowds of men in great multitudes both old and young;and Alcinous killed them a dozen sheep, eight full grown pigs, and twooxen. These they skinned and dressed so as to provide a magnificentbanquet.

  • 瓦利 08-03

    {  On this the women came down in a body, weeping and wailing bitterly.First they carried the dead bodies out, and propped them up againstone another in the gatehouse. Ulysses ordered them about and made themdo their work quickly, so they had to carry the bodies out. Whenthey had done this, they cleaned all the tables and seats with spongesand water, while Telemachus and the two others shovelled up theblood and dirt from the ground, and the women carried it all awayand put it out of doors. Then when they had made the whole place quiteclean and orderly, they took the women out and hemmed them in thenarrow space between the wall of the domed room and that of theyard, so that they could not get away: and Telemachus said to theother two, "I shall not let these women die a clean death, for theywere insolent to me and my mother, and used to sleep with thesuitors."

  • 张骥 08-02

      On this Telemachus came forward and said, "Sirs, are you mad? Canyou not carry your meat and your liquor decently? Some evil spirit haspossessed you. I do not wish to drive any of you away, but you havehad your suppers, and the sooner you all go home to bed the better."}

  • 孙翠凤 08-02

      "'My friends,' said he, 'I have had a dream from heaven in my sleep.We are a long way from the ships; I wish some one would go down andtell Agamemnon to send us up more men at once.'

  • 王晓峰 08-02

      "'You dare-devil,' replied the goddess, you are always wanting tofight somebody or something; you will not let yourself be beateneven by the immortals. For Scylla is not mortal; moreover she issavage, extreme, rude, cruel and invincible. There is no help forit; your best chance will be to get by her as fast as ever you can,for if you dawdle about her rock while you are putting on your armour,she may catch you with a second cast of her six heads, and snap upanother half dozen of your men; so drive your ship past her at fullspeed, and roar out lustily to Crataiis who is Scylla's dam, badluck to her; she will then stop her from making a second raid uponyou.

  • 西-成都 08-01

       "Ulysses," said Minerva, "noble son of Laertes, think how you canlay hands on these disreputable people who have been lording it inyour house these three years, courting your wife and making weddingpresents to her, while she does nothing but lament your absence,giving hope and sending your encouraging messages to every one ofthem, but meaning the very opposite of all she says'

  • 劳伦斯 07-30

    {  The company then laid their hands upon the good things that werebefore them, but as soon as they had had enough to eat and drink,the muse inspired Demodocus to sing the feats of heroes, and moreespecially a matter that was then in the mouths of all men, to wit,the quarrel between Ulysses and Achilles, and the fierce words thatthey heaped on one another as they gat together at a banquet. ButAgamemnon was glad when he heard his chieftains quarrelling with oneanother, for Apollo had foretold him this at Pytho when he crossed thestone floor to consult the oracle. Here was the beginning of theevil that by the will of Jove fell both Danaans and Trojans.

  • 吴礼九 07-30

      "Even so, however, I did not get them away without misadventure.We had with us a certain youth named Elpenor, not very remarkablefor sense or courage, who had got drunk and was lying on the house-topaway from the rest of the men, to sleep off his liquor in the cool.When he heard the noise of the men bustling about, he jumped up on asudden and forgot all about coming down by the main staircase, so hetumbled right off the roof and broke his neck, and his soul wentdown to the house of Hades.

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