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类型【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1:庞亚轮 大小:gBxWJL2X88329KB 下载:ruul5NFa45687次
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日期:2020-08-05 07:54:16
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1.【址:a g 9 559⒐ v i p】1  Menelaus on hearing this was very much shocked. "So," heexclaimed, "these cowards would usurp a brave man's bed? A hindmight as well lay her new born young in the lair of a lion, and thengo off to feed in the forest or in some grassy dell: the lion whenhe comes back to his lair will make short work with the pair ofthem- and so will Ulysses with these suitors. By father Jove, Minerva,and Apollo, if Ulysses is still the man that he was when he wrestledwith Philomeleides in Lesbos, and threw him so heavily that all theAchaeans cheered him- if he is still such and were to come nearthese suitors, they would have a short shrift and a sorry wedding.As regards your questions, however, I will not prevaricate nor deceiveyou, but will tell you without concealment all that the old man of thesea told me.
2.  MINERVA now put it in Penelope's mind to make the suitors trytheir skill with the bow and with the iron axes, in contest amongthemselves, as a means of bringing about their destruction. She wentupstairs and got the store room key, which was made of bronze andhad a handle of ivory; she then went with her maidens into the storeroom at the end of the house, where her husband's treasures of gold,bronze, and wrought iron were kept, and where was also his bow, andthe quiver full of deadly arrows that had been given him by a friendwhom he had met in Lacedaemon- Iphitus the son of Eurytus. The twofell in with one another in Messene at the house of Ortilochus,where Ulysses was staying in order to recover a debt that was owingfrom the whole people; for the Messenians had carried off threehundred sheep from Ithaca, and had sailed away with them and withtheir shepherds. In quest of these Ulysses took a long journey whilestill quite young, for his father and the other chieftains sent him ona mission to recover them. Iphitus had gone there also to try andget back twelve brood mares that he had lost, and the mule foalsthat were running with them. These mares were the death of him inthe end, for when he went to the house of Jove's son, mighty Hercules,who performed such prodigies of valour, Hercules to his shame killedhim, though he was his guest, for he feared not heaven's vengeance,nor yet respected his own table which he had set before Iphitus, butkilled him in spite of everything, and kept the mares himself. Itwas when claiming these that Iphitus met Ulysses, and gave him the bowwhich mighty Eurytus had been used to carry, and which on his deathhad been left by him to his son. Ulysses gave him in return a swordand a spear, and this was the beginning of a fast friendship, althoughthey never visited at one another's houses, for Jove's son Herculeskilled Iphitus ere they could do so. This bow, then, given him byIphitus, had not been taken with him by Ulysses when he sailed forTroy; he had used it so long as he had been at home, but had left itbehind as having been a keepsake from a valued friend.
3.  The servant carried the pork in his fingers over to Demodocus, whotook it and was very much pleased. They then laid their hands on thegood things that were before them, and as soon as they had had toeat and drink, Ulysses said to Demodocus, "Demodocus, there is noone in the world whom I admire more than I do you. You must havestudied under the Muse, Jove's daughter, and under Apollo, soaccurately do you sing the return of the Achaeans with all theirsufferings and adventures. If you were not there yourself, you musthave heard it all from some one who was. Now, however, change yoursong and tell us of the wooden horse which Epeus made with theassistance of Minerva, and which Ulysses got by stratagem into thefort of Troy after freighting it with the men who afterwards sackedthe city. If you will sing this tale aright I will tell all theworld how magnificently heaven has endowed you."
4.  "Then came also the ghost of Theban Teiresias, with his goldensceptre in his hand. He knew me and said, 'Ulysses, noble son ofLaertes, why, poor man, have you left the light of day and come downto visit the dead in this sad place? Stand back from the trench andwithdraw your sword that I may drink of the blood and answer yourquestions truly.'
5.  Ulysses, therefore, went to Parnassus to get the presents fromAutolycus, who with his sons shook hands with him and gave himwelcome. His grandmother Amphithea threw her arms about him, andkissed his head, and both his beautiful eyes, while Autolycusdesired his sons to get dinner ready, and they did as he told them.They brought in a five year old bull, flayed it, made it ready anddivided it into joints; these they then cut carefully up intosmaller pieces and spitted them; they roasted them sufficiently andserved the portions round. Thus through the livelong day to thegoing down of the sun they feasted, and every man had his full shareso that all were satisfied; but when the sun set and it came ondark, they went to bed and enjoyed the boon of sleep.
6.  As he spoke he handed her the cup. Minerva thought it very right andproper of him to have given it to herself first; she accordingly beganpraying heartily to Neptune. "O thou," she cried, "that encirclest theearth, vouchsafe to grant the prayers of thy servants that call uponthee. More especially we pray thee send down thy grace on Nestor andon his sons; thereafter also make the rest of the Pylian people somehandsome return for the goodly hecatomb they are offering you. Lastly,grant Telemachus and myself a happy issue, in respect of the matterthat has brought us in our to Pylos."

计划指导

1.  Menelaus then greeted them saying, "Fall to, and welcome; when youhave done supper I shall ask who you are, for the lineage of suchmen as you cannot have been lost. You must be descended from a line ofsceptre-bearing kings, for poor people do not have such sons as youare."
2.  Telemachus answered, "Antinous, do not chide with me, but, godwilling, I will be chief too if I can. Is this the worst fate youcan think of for me? It is no bad thing to be a chief, for it bringsboth riches and honour. Still, now that Ulysses is dead there are manygreat men in Ithaca both old and young, and some other may take thelead among them; nevertheless I will be chief in my own house, andwill rule those whom Ulysses has won for me."
3.  "'Keep still,' said he in a low voice, 'or the others will hearyou.' Then he raised his head on his elbow.
4.  Then Minerva said to Jove, "Father, son of Saturn, king of kings,answer me this question- What do you propose to do? Will you setthem fighting still further, or will you make peace between them?"
5.  Thus did they converse, and presently Mercury came up to them withthe ghosts of the suitors who had been killed by Ulysses. The ghostsof Agamemnon and Achilles were astonished at seeing them, and wentup to them at once. The ghost of Agamemnon recognized Amphimedon sonof Melaneus, who lived in Ithaca and had been his host, so it began totalk to him.
6.  "Firstly, then, I will tell you my name that you too may know it,and one day, if I outlive this time of sorrow, may become my thereguests though I live so far away from all of you. I am Ulysses sonof Laertes, reknowned among mankind for all manner of subtlety, sothat my fame ascends to heaven. I live in Ithaca, where there is ahigh mountain called Neritum, covered with forests; and not far fromit there is a group of islands very near to one another- Dulichium,Same, and the wooded island of Zacynthus. It lies squat on thehorizon, all highest up in the sea towards the sunset, while theothers lie away from it towards dawn. It is a rugged island, but itbreeds brave men, and my eyes know none that they better love tolook upon. The goddess Calypso kept me with her in her cave, andwanted me to marry her, as did also the cunning Aeaean goddessCirce; but they could neither of them persuade me, for there isnothing dearer to a man than his own country and his parents, andhowever splendid a home he may have in a foreign country, if it be farfrom father or mother, he does not care about it. Now, however, I willtell you of the many hazardous adventures which by Jove's will I metwith on my return from Troy.

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1.  "I will tell you everything," answered Ulysses, "quite truly. I comefrom Alybas, where I have a fine house. I am son of king Apheidas, whois the son of Polypemon. My own name is Eperitus; heaven drove meoff my course as I was leaving Sicania, and I have been carried hereagainst my will. As for my ship it is lying over yonder, off theopen country outside the town, and this is the fifth year sinceUlysses left my country. Poor fellow, yet the omens were good forhim when he left me. The birds all flew on our right hands, and bothhe and I rejoiced to see them as we parted, for we had every hope thatwe should have another friendly meeting and exchange presents."
2.  "Meanwhile Eurylochus had been giving evil counsel to the men,'Listen to me,' said he, 'my poor comrades. All deaths are badenough but there is none so bad as famine. Why should not we drivein the best of these cows and offer them in sacrifice to theimmortal Rods? If we ever get back to Ithaca, we can build a finetemple to the sun-god and enrich it with every kind of ornament; if,however, he is determined to sink our ship out of revenge for thesehomed cattle, and the other gods are of the same mind, I for one wouldrather drink salt water once for all and have done with it, than bestarved to death by inches in such a desert island as this is.'
3.  "Meanwhile Lampetie went straight off to the sun and told him we hadbeen killing his cows, whereon he flew into a great rage, and saidto the immortals, 'Father Jove, and all you other gods who live ineverlasting bliss, I must have vengeance on the crew of Ulysses' ship:they have had the insolence to kill my cows, which were the onething I loved to look upon, whether I was going up heaven or downagain. If they do not square accounts with me about my cows, I will godown to Hades and shine there among the dead.'
4.  "They sang these words most musically, and as I longed to hearthem further I made by frowning to my men that they should set mefree; but they quickened their stroke, and Eurylochus and Perimedesbound me with still stronger bonds till we had got out of hearing ofthe Sirens' voices. Then my men took the wax from their ears andunbound me.
5.   Immediately afterwards Ulysses came inside, looking like a poormiserable old beggar, leaning on his staff and with his clothes all inrags. He sat down upon the threshold of ash-wood just inside the doorsleading from the outer to the inner court, and against abearing-post of cypress-wood which the carpenter had skillfullyplaned, and had made to join truly with rule and line. Telemachus tooka whole loaf from the bread-basket, with as much meat as he could holdin his two hands, and said to Eumaeus, "Take this to the stranger, andtell him to go the round of the suitors, and beg from them; a beggarmust not be shamefaced."
6.  "Sir, give me something; you are not, surely, the poorest manhere; you seem to be a chief, foremost among them all; therefore youshould be the better giver, and I will tell far and wide of yourbounty. I too was a rich man once, and had a fine house of my own;in those days I gave to many a tramp such as I now am, no matter whohe might be nor what he wanted. I had any number of servants, andall the other things which people have who live well and are accountedwealthy, but it pleased Jove to take all away from me. He sent me witha band of roving robbers to Egypt; it was a long voyage and I wasundone by it. I stationed my bade ships in the river Aegyptus, andbade my men stay by them and keep guard over them, while sent outscouts to reconnoitre from every point of vantage.

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1.  "'Come here,' they sang, 'renowned Ulysses, honour to the Achaeanname, and listen to our two voices. No one ever sailed past us withoutstaying to hear the enchanting sweetness of our song- and he wholistens will go on his way not only charmed, but wiser, for we knowall the ills that the gods laid upon the Argives and Trojans beforeTroy, and can tell you everything that is going to happen over thewhole world.'
2.  Thus said the suitors, but Antinous paid them no heed. MeanwhileTelemachus was furious about the blow that had been given to hisfather, and though no tear fell from him, he shook his head in silenceand brooded on his revenge.
3.  Pontonous then mixed wine and water, and handed it round aftergiving every man his drink-offering. When they had made theirofferings, and had drunk each as much as he was minded, Alcinous said:
4、  Then Ulysses said to Telemachus, "Call nurse Euryclea; I havesomething to say to her."
5、  Meanwhile Philoetius slipped quietly out and made fast the gatesof the outer court. There was a ship's cable of byblus fibre lyingin the gatehouse, so he made the gates fast with it and then came inagain, resuming the seat that he had left, and keeping an eye onUlysses, who had now got the bow in his hands, and was turning itevery way about, and proving it all over to see whether the wormshad been eating into its two horns during his absence. Then wouldone turn towards his neighbour saying, "This is some tricky oldbow-fancier; either he has got one like it at home, or he wants tomake one, in such workmanlike style does the old vagabond handle it."

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网友评论(7njVX3k015584))

  • 吕勃 08-04

      "Leiodes, what are you talking about? Your words are monstrous andintolerable; it makes me angry to listen to you. Shall, then, this bowtake the life of many a chief among us, merely because you cannot bendit yourself? True, you were not born to be an archer, but there areothers who will soon string it."

  • 康康舞 08-04

      Thus did they converse, but King Apollo said to Mercury,"Messenger Mercury, giver of good things, you would not care howstrong the chains were, would you, if you could sleep with Venus?"

  • 张防艾 08-04

       In the end he deemed it best to take to the woods, and he foundone upon some high ground not far from the water. There he creptbeneath two shoots of olive that grew from a single stock- the onean ungrafted sucker, while the other had been grafted. No wind,however squally, could break through the cover they afforded, norcould the sun's rays pierce them, nor the rain get through them, soclosely did they grow into one another. Ulysses crept under theseand began to make himself a bed to lie on, for there was a greatlitter of dead leaves lying about- enough to make a covering for twoor three men even in hard winter weather. He was glad enough to seethis, so he laid himself down and heaped the leaves all round him.Then, as one who lives alone in the country, far from any neighbor,hides a brand as fire-seed in the ashes to save himself from having toget a light elsewhere, even so did Ulysses cover himself up withleaves; and Minerva shed a sweet sleep upon his eyes, closed hiseyelids, and made him lose all memories of his sorrows.

  • 阿布力米提 08-04

      He then chose twenty men, and they went down to their. ship and tothe sea side; they drew the vessel into the water and got her mast andsails inside her; they bound the oars to the thole-pins with twistedthongs of leather, all in due course, and spread the white sailsaloft, while their fine servants brought them their armour. Thenthey made the ship fast a little way out, came on shore again, gottheir suppers, and waited till night should fall.

  • 郑玉林 08-03

    {  Telemachus and the son of Nestor stayed their horses at the gate,whereon Eteoneus servant to Menelaus came out, and as soon as he sawthem ran hurrying back into the house to tell his Master. He wentclose up to him and said, "Menelaus, there are some strangers comehere, two men, who look like sons of Jove. What are we to do? Shall wetake their horses out, or tell them to find friends elsewhere asthey best can?"

  • 刘永军 08-02

      "What, my dear, are you talking about?" replied her father, "did younot send him there yourself, because you thought it would help Ulyssesto get home and punish the suitors? Besides, you are perfectly able toprotect Telemachus, and to see him safely home again, while thesuitors have to come hurry-skurrying back without having killed him."}

  • 赵君路 08-02

      NOW when the child of morning, rosy-fingered Dawn, appeared,Alcinous and Ulysses both rose, and Alcinous led the way to thePhaecian place of assembly, which was near the ships. When they gotthere they sat down side by side on a seat of polished stone, whileMinerva took the form of one of Alcinous' servants, and went round thetown in order to help Ulysses to get home. She went up to thecitizens, man by man, and said, "Aldermen and town councillors ofthe Phaeacians, come to the assembly all of you and listen to thestranger who has just come off a long voyage to the house of KingAlcinous; he looks like an immortal god."

  • 吕良伟 08-02

      Then Ulysses said, "Sir, it is right that I should say somethingmyself. I am much shocked about what you have said about theinsolent way in which the suitors are behaving in despite of such aman as you are. Tell me, do you submit to such treatment tamely, orhas some god set your people against you? May you not complain of yourbrothers- for it is to these that a man may look for support,however great his quarrel may be? I wish I were as young as you areand in my present mind; if I were son to Ulysses, or, indeed,Ulysses himself, I would rather some one came and cut my head off, butI would go to the house and be the bane of every one of these men.If they were too many for me- I being single-handed- I would ratherdie fighting in my own house than see such disgraceful sights dayafter day, strangers grossly maltreated, and men dragging the womenservants about the house in an unseemly way, wine drawn recklessly,and bread wasted all to no purpose for an end that shall never beaccomplished."

  • 崔国萁 08-01

       At last, however, Ulysses said, "Wife, we have not yet reached theend of our troubles. I have an unknown amount of toil still toundergo. It is long and difficult, but I must go through with it,for thus the shade of Teiresias prophesied concerning me, on the daywhen I went down into Hades to ask about my return and that of mycompanions. But now let us go to bed, that we may lie down and enjoythe blessed boon of sleep."

  • 鲍勃·古德莱特 07-30

    {  "And a pretty figure I should cut then," replied Eumaeus, both nowand hereafter, if I were to kill you after receiving you into my hutand showing you hospitality. I should have to say my prayers in goodearnest if I did; but it is just supper time and I hope my men willcome in directly, that we may cook something savoury for supper."

  • 龙燕均 07-30

      BOOK IX.

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